adieu

(redirected from adieus)
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bid adieu to (someone or something)

1. To say goodbye to someone or something. "Adieu" is a French valediction that literally means "to God." Because I had a train to catch, I had to bid adieu to them quite early in the evening, unfortunately. It was hard to bid adieu to college, but I knew deep down that it was time to move on.
2. To part with something, such as a possession. It's time for you to bid adieu to these ratty old t-shirts.
See also: adieu, bid

bid (someone or something) adieu

1. To say goodbye to someone. "Adieu" is a French valediction that literally means "to God." Unfortunately, I've got a train to catch, so I must bid you all adieu now. It was hard bidding college adieu, but I knew deep down that it was time to move on.
2. To part with something, such as a possession. It's time for you to bid these ratty old t-shirts adieu. Bid your phone adieu, because I'm confiscating it.
See also: adieu, bid

bid adieu to someone or something

Cliché to say good-bye to someone or something. (The word adieu is French for good-bye and should not be confused with ado.) Now it's time to bid adieu to all of you gathered here. He silently bid adieu to his favorite hat as the wind carried it down the street.
See also: adieu, bid

bid adieu

Say goodbye, take leave of, as in It's beyond my bedtime, so I bid you all adieu, or I'll be glad to bid adieu to these crutches. French for "goodbye," adieu literally means "to God" and was part of à dieu vous commant, "I commend you to God." Adopted into English in the 1300s, it was first recorded in Chaucer's Troilus and Cressida (c. 1385). Today it is considered quite formal, although it also is used humorously.
See also: adieu, bid

bid adieu

Say good-bye. This formulaic farewell uses the French adieu, meaning “to God,” and has done so since Chaucer’s time. It is now considered rather formal, although it also is used humorously. In fact, humorist Charles Farrar Browne, under the pen name Artemus Ward, joked about it back in 1862: “I now bid you a welcome adoo” (Artemus Ward: His Book. The Shakers).
See also: adieu, bid
References in classic literature ?
"Adieu, adieu, adieu," she said, without the soul communicating one single intelligent inflexion to the word.
See, only, that I have not been base, and that I have come to bid thee this last adieu. The Lord is my witness, Raoul, that if with my life I could have redeemed thine, I would have given that life without hesitation.
"Adieu, adieu!" murmured the old man, clasping Edmond's hand convulsively -- "adieu!"
Adieu -- adieu!" And raising himself by a final effort, in which he summoned all his faculties, he said, -- "Monte Cristo, forget not Monte Cristo!" And he fell back on the bed.
There's your adieus, au revoir, auf wiedersehen, ciao, arrivederci, sayonara, hasta la vista and adios.
youths, but in these orbits How flicker shimmering god images of adieus.