address (oneself) to

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address (oneself) to

1. To speak to a specific person or group at the exclusion of others. Right now, I'm only addressing myself to the graduating seniors. I'll talk to the other grades tomorrow.
2. To focus on a certain problem or situation. I needed to address myself to the burst pipe in my basement—that's why I didn't attend the dinner party.
See also: address

address something to someone

to write someone's name and address on an envelope, package, letter, etc. Gilbert addressed the envelope to Walter.
See also: address

address to

v.
1. To indicate that something is to be sent to someone or some place by writing an address on it: She addressed the letter to her brother.
2. To say something directly to some specific person or group: The school president addressed the speech to everyone who plans to graduate this year.
3. To focus someone on a problem in order to find a solution. Used reflexively: In the next meeting, the town officials will address themselves to the issue of privacy.
See also: address
References in classic literature ?
Although Mr List and Mr Jowl addressed themselves to each other, it was remarkable that they both looked narrowly at the old man, who, with his eyes fixed upon the fire, sat brooding over it, yet listening eagerly-- as it seemed from a certain involuntary motion of the head, or twitching of the face from time to time--to all they said.
The cook and the parlour-maid addressed themselves to comforting and healing the scullery-maid.
But he continued to talk of his glorious father-in-law, and it was in the course of that conversation that he told me how, when the Liverpool relations of the poet's late wife naturally addressed themselves to him in considerable concern, suggesting a friendly consultation as to the boy's future, the incensed (but always refined) poet wrote in answer a letter of mere polished badinage which offended mortally the Liverpool people.
Zhichao Liu and colleagues addressed themselves to the task of extrapolating in vitro toxicity results to predicting risk in humans by comparing datasets for chemicals each tested on primary human cells, primary rat cells and live rats.
The two preceding articles addressed themselves to Governor Jim Florio's solutions--elimination of policy constraints as well as the two residual market subsidies which are included in every auto policy premium, a total of up to $222 in Residual Market Equalization Charges (RMECs).
Anderson's aim in these chapters is to argue that Vietnamese and Tai rulers established their positions through negotiated interactions, and, in the process, addressed themselves to multiple audiences.
Readers, writers, reviewers, printers, publishers, and booksellers addressed themselves to the building of a particularly American literature, distinguished from its European and British roots and appropriate for citizens of the new republic.
One gap that might be filled in any later collection is the absence of an essay on medical thought, where there were changes that could be said to amount to a revolution as practitioners addressed themselves to careful recording of cases.
Still, that is no excuse for the neglect of this immensely important problem: if academics addressed themselves to this issue, their moral authority might begin to make a difference, however small.
The students addressed themselves to the new US President Barack Obama, and called on him to redefine his country's policy in terms of foreign policy and to contribute to reaching an agreement on international problems, including the Cyprus problem.
They too addressed themselves to the author--Jeffrey above all.
However, the importance of chapter (6) is the fact that authors addressed themselves to the challenges faced by poor and laboring women and they build their analysis from the experience of women in South Asia.
The creative way that Nez Perce and Dakota pastors addressed themselves to ecclesial structure in this story of Presbyterian Native mission provides an intriguing glimpse into the challenges of the time.
My book, by contrast, tries to assess the meaning of the nation's most widely read theologies, penned by authors who addressed themselves to the broadest public issues through decades when such widely visible thinkers were more important for the nation's public intellectual life than theologians have ever been since.
The chapters that offer specific insights into one country were, by and large, more helpful than chapters that addressed themselves to issues "in Africa.