add insult to injury

(redirected from adding insult to injury)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

add insult to injury

To exacerbate an already problematic situation in a way that is humiliating; to make someone who has just experienced injury or defeat feel worse about the situation with one's words. A: "Well, it's not like you were having a great season before you broke your leg." B: "Thanks for adding insult to injury." I was already late for work and, to add insult to injury, I spilled coffee all over myself.
See also: add, injury, insult

add insult to injury

Fig. Cliché to make a bad situation worse; to hurt the feelings of a person who has already been hurt. First, the basement flooded, and then, to add insult to injury, a pipe burst in the kitchen. My car barely started this morning, and to add insult to injury, I got a flat tire in the driveway.
See also: add, injury, insult

add insult to injury

Hurt a person's feelings after doing him or her harm; also, make a bad situation worse. For example, Not only did the club refuse him, but it published a list of the rejected applicants-that's adding insult to injury , or The nearest parking space was half a mile away, and then, to add insult to injury, it began to pour : The phrase is an ancient one, even older than its often cited use in the Roman writer Phaedrus's fable of the bald man and the fly. A fly bit the head of a bald man, who, trying to crush it, gave himself a heavy blow. The fly then jeered, "You want to avenge an insect's sting with death; what will you do to yourself, who have added insult to injury?" In English it was first recorded in 1748.
See also: add, injury, insult

add insult to injury

COMMON If someone or something adds insult to injury, they make a bad situation worse by doing or causing another bad thing. She stood there and made him wash every part of his body. She then added insult to injury by trimming his hair and making him wear a linen shirt several sizes too big for him. Birth is such a shock, and what usually follows adds insult to injury. The poor little thing is held upside down and slapped. Note: You can use to add insult to injury or adding insult to injury to introduce a further unpleasant thing that has happened and that you are reporting. The driver of the car that killed Simon Collins got away with a £250 fine. To add insult to injury, he drove away from court in his own car.
See also: add, injury, insult

add insult to injury

do or say something that makes a bad or displeasing situation even worse.
This phrase comes from Edward Moore's play The Foundling ( 1748 ): ‘This is adding insult to injuries’.
See also: add, injury, insult

add ˌinsult to ˈinjury

make a bad relationship with somebody worse by offending them even more: She forgot to send me an invitation to her party and then added insult to injury by asking to borrow my jacket!
See also: add, injury, insult
References in periodicals archive ?
Adding insult to injury Tuesday was the way Oakland right-hander Gil Heredia tamed the Angels, shutting them out on four hits until Darin Erstad led off the eighth inning with a booming home run to center field.
Adding insult to injury was the way Oakland right-hander Gil Heredia tamed the Angels.
Adding insult to injury, women not only suffer from blatant discrimination, but if they are salaried, they also do not receive overtime pay, the Complaint alleges.
In fact, it is the Republicans who are adding insult to injury.
Adding insult to injury, many of these lifeboats left the sinking ship only partially filled.
Adding insult to injury in the eyes of the radicals, Johnson vetoed the Civil Rights Bill of 1866, which would have accorded African-American Freedmen with citizenship and voting rights.
Adding insult to injury, the decision effectively raises the cost of basic service statewide by reducing the number of uncharged directory assistance calls included in basic residential service and totally eliminating uncharged calls for small businesses.
Adding insult to injury is the magazine's ``20 Greatest Food Cities'' story by Jonathan Hayes in the same issue, subtitled ``A global guide to the world's culinary capitals.
For weeks leading up to the gathering, Internet discussion boards dedicated to THQ were filled with messages from disgruntled shareholders who blamed Farrel for losing the WCW license, failing to split the company's stock to increase liquidity and, adding insult to injury, seeking approval to issue more stock options to employees and management.