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add fuel to the flame(s)

To do or say something to make an argument, problem, or bad situation worse; to further incense an already angry person or group of people. The debate was going poorly for the senatorial candidate, and his strikingly uncouth comments simply added fuel to the flames. Revelations of the CEO's massive retirement package added fuel to the flame for consumers already furious over the company's dubious financial dealings.
See also: add, fuel

add (one's) two penn'orth

To share one's opinion, idea, or point of view, regardless of whether or not others want to hear it. ("Penn'orth" is a contraction of "pennies' worth.") Primarily heard in UK. I find Jeff's husband a bit trying at times. He always has to add his two penn'orth, even when it's clear he knows nothing about what's being discussed. If I can just add my two penn'orth, I think the staff would really appreciate a bump in their pay, and productivity would increase as a result.
See also: add, two

amount to the same thing

To be essentially the same. The phrase usually implies that the difference between two things has no significant consequence. I don't care who started the fight, it all amounts to the same thing: you getting suspended from school. These different expenses all amount to the same thing: money coming out of my bank account.
See also: amount, same, thing

add fuel to the fire

To do or say something to make an argument, problem, or bad situation worse; to further incense an already angry person or group of people. The debate was going poorly for the senatorial candidate, and his strikingly uncouth comments simply added fuel to the fire. Revelations of the CEO's massive retirement package added fuel to the fire for consumers already furious over the company's dubious financial dealings.
See also: add, fire, fuel

add fuel to the flames

To do or say something to make an argument, problem, or bad situation worse; to further incense an already angry person or group of people. The debate was going poorly for the senatorial candidate, and his strikingly uncouth comments simply added fuel to the flames. Revelations of the CEO's massive retirement package added fuel to the flames for consumers already furious over the company's dubious financial dealings.
See also: add, flame, fuel

add insult to injury

To exacerbate an already problematic situation in a way that is humiliating; to make someone who has just experienced injury or defeat feel worse about the situation with one's words. A: "Well, it's not like you were having a great season before you broke your leg." B: "Thanks for adding insult to injury." I was already late for work and, to add insult to injury, I spilled coffee all over myself.
See also: add, injury, insult

add (something) into

To mix or join two or more things together. Make sure you add milk into the brownie mix before putting the pan in the oven. Can we add some more herbs into the sauce? It's pretty bland.
See also: add

add (something) together

To calculate the sum or total of multiple items. Can you take these receipts and add the totals together for me?
See also: add, together

add up

1. To calculate the sum or total of multiple items. Can you add up these numbers? I'm worried I made an error in my calculations.
2. To equal the expected or presumed amount. These numbers just aren't adding up—I think I made a mistake somewhere.
3. To be logical or believable. I listened to Jill's explanation, but I'm still skeptical—something just doesn't add up.
4. To become a significant amount. Usually used in reference to increasing expenses. With all of the driving I do for work, the cost of gas and maintenance really starts to add up. It will take a while for you to become a master, but all this practice really does add up.
5. To judge someone or something As I waited for my interview to start, I studied the other candidates and added up my competition.
See also: add, up

add up to

To equal or amount to something. The cash in the drawer doesn't add up to the amount of sales we made today. These new details do not add up to the story the witnesses told us.
See also: add, up

add on

1. verb To add something to something else; to include something with something else. I think we can add one more room on to the downstairs. Can we add on another day if we want to extend our trip?
2. noun Something that has been attached to or joined with something else. In this usage, the phrase is typically hyphenated. This room is clearly just an add-on—it doesn't match the rest of the house at all.
See also: add, on

add to (something)

1. To combine something with something else. The thing being added can be named between "add" and "to." Did I add too much salt to the recipe?
2. To increase something in some way. The power outage simply added to our woes.
See also: add

add a new wrinkle

To bring or contribute a new and often unexpected aspect, dimension, innovation, development, or stratagem (to something). If proven to be true, the discovery could add a new wrinkle to the way we think about the evolutionary process. Their new, and unorthodox, pitcher has added a new wrinkle to the team's offensive game.
See also: add, new, wrinkle

add fuel to the fire

 and add fuel to the flame
Fig. to make a problem worse; to say or do something that makes a bad situation worse; to make an angry person get even angrier. (Alludes to causing a flame to grow larger someone or something to move forward when fuel is added.) Shouting at a crying child just adds fuel to the fire.
See also: add, fire, fuel

add insult to injury

Fig. Cliché to make a bad situation worse; to hurt the feelings of a person who has already been hurt. First, the basement flooded, and then, to add insult to injury, a pipe burst in the kitchen. My car barely started this morning, and to add insult to injury, I got a flat tire in the driveway.
See also: add, injury, insult

add something into something

 and add
(something) in to introduce something into something else. Now, add the eggs into the mixture. Add in some more eggs.
See also: add

add (something) to something

to increase the intensity or amount of something by giving more (of something) to it. You added too much sugar to my coffee.
See also: add

add (something) to something

to increase the intensity or amount of something by giving more (of something) to it. You added too much sugar to my coffee.
See also: add

add something together

to sum or total two or more things. Add these two together and tell me what you get.
See also: add, together

add something up

to sum or total a set of figures. (See also add up (to something).) Please add these figures up again. I didn't add up these figures!
See also: add, up

add up

 (to something)
1. Lit. [for a set of figures] to equal a total. These figures don't add up to the right total!
2. Fig. [for facts or explanations] to make sense. (Considering facts as if they were figures.) Your explanation just doesn't add up!
See also: add, up

amount to the same thing

 and come to the same thing; add up to the same thing
Fig. to be the same [as something]. Borrowing can be the same as stealing. If the owner does not know what you have borrowed, it amounts to the same thing. With cars—whether they're red or blue—it comes to the same thing.
See also: amount, same, thing

tack something onto something

 and tack something on
to add something onto something. The waiter kept tacking charges onto my bill. He tacked on charge after charge.
See also: tack

add fuel to the fire

Also, add fuel to the flames. Worsen an already bad situation, as by increasing anger, hostility, or passion, as in Bill was upset, and your making fun of his mishap just added fuel to the fire. This metaphor dates from Roman times-Livy used it in his history of Rome-and it remains in common use. For similar metaphors, see add insult to injury; fan the flames.
See also: add, fire, fuel

add insult to injury

Hurt a person's feelings after doing him or her harm; also, make a bad situation worse. For example, Not only did the club refuse him, but it published a list of the rejected applicants-that's adding insult to injury , or The nearest parking space was half a mile away, and then, to add insult to injury, it began to pour : The phrase is an ancient one, even older than its often cited use in the Roman writer Phaedrus's fable of the bald man and the fly. A fly bit the head of a bald man, who, trying to crush it, gave himself a heavy blow. The fly then jeered, "You want to avenge an insect's sting with death; what will you do to yourself, who have added insult to injury?" In English it was first recorded in 1748.
See also: add, injury, insult

add up

1. Amount to an expected or correct total, as in These figures don't add up, meaning they are not correct. [Mid-1800s]
2. Be consistent, make sense, as in I'm not sure that all this testimony will add up. [First half of 1900s]
3. Assess, form an opinion of, as in He looked across the track and added up the competition. Also see add up to.
See also: add, up

add up to

Amount to, signify, as in The smooth airline connections, luxury hotel, and fine weather added up to the best vacation we'd ever had . [Early 1900s] Also see add up.
See also: add, up

amount to the same thing

Also, come to the same thing. Make no difference, be the same, as in Since it's supposed to rain all day, whether I go outdoors now or later will amount to the same thing , or Paying in cash or with a credit card, it comes to the same thing.
See also: amount, same, thing

add fuel to the fire

or

add fuel to the flames

COMMON If something that someone says or does adds fuel to the fire or adds fuel to the flames, it makes a bad situation worse. You must not try to borrow more money to get yourself out of trouble. This really would be adding fuel to the fire. Her resignation is only likely to add fuel to the flames. Note: These expressions are very variable. For example, you can say that something fuels the fire or fuels the flames, or just that it adds fuel. I'm not going to fuel the fire here: people are perfectly entitled to their own opinion. His comments are bound to add fuel to the debate already taking place within the party about the Greens' public image.
See also: add, fire, fuel

add insult to injury

COMMON If someone or something adds insult to injury, they make a bad situation worse by doing or causing another bad thing. She stood there and made him wash every part of his body. She then added insult to injury by trimming his hair and making him wear a linen shirt several sizes too big for him. Birth is such a shock, and what usually follows adds insult to injury. The poor little thing is held upside down and slapped. Note: You can use to add insult to injury or adding insult to injury to introduce a further unpleasant thing that has happened and that you are reporting. The driver of the car that killed Simon Collins got away with a £250 fine. To add insult to injury, he drove away from court in his own car.
See also: add, injury, insult

add fuel to the fire (or flames)

(of a person or circumstance) cause a situation or conflict to become more intense, especially by provocative comments.
See also: add, fire, fuel

add insult to injury

do or say something that makes a bad or displeasing situation even worse.
This phrase comes from Edward Moore's play The Foundling ( 1748 ): ‘This is adding insult to injuries’.
See also: add, injury, insult

add (or put in) your twopenn'orth

contribute your opinion. informal
The literal meaning of twopenn'orth is ‘an amount of something that is worth or costs two pence’; by extension it can also be used to mean ‘a small or insignificant amount of something’.
See also: add

add ˌfuel to the ˈfire/ˈflames

do or say something which makes a difficult situation worse, or makes somebody even more angry, etc: She was already furious and his apologies and excuses only added fuel to the flames. OPPOSITE: pour oil on troubled water(s)
See also: add, fire, flame, fuel

add ˌinsult to ˈinjury

make a bad relationship with somebody worse by offending them even more: She forgot to send me an invitation to her party and then added insult to injury by asking to borrow my jacket!
See also: add, injury, insult

add on

v.
1. To increase, by some additional amount, a quantity that is associated with something: The waiter added $5 on the bill for the extra pretzels we ordered. That tip is too low for the good service we had, so let's add on another dollar. Last night, the storm added on more than twenty inches to the record snowfall.
2. To attach something in order to extend or enlarge something else: We're adding another room on the back of the house. The guest list is full, so we can't add anybody else on. If there aren't enough logs in the fire, add another one on.
See also: add, on

add to

v.
To increase the amount or intensity of something: The increase in fuel prices will add to the cost of living in the city. After I broke my arm, I added to my misery by chipping a tooth.
See also: add

add up

v.
1. To calculate a sum by adding some set of numbers: The students added up the numbers they had copied from the blackboard. If you add all the scores up, we'll find out who won.
2. To calculate something, especially by addition: The shopkeeper added up the day's profits.
3. To amount to an expected total: Unfortunately, when we put the numbers into the equation, they did not add up.
4. To be reasonable, plausible, or consistent; make sense: The jury did not believe the witness's testimony because it simply did not add up.
See also: add, up

add up to

To constitute; amount to: The revisions added up to a lot of work.
See also: add, up
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As a member of Kenora's local value added committee, McKay is continually searching for ways to capitalize on secondary products.
Mark Weeks, group R&D director for D/R Added Value, and the originator of the EBC approach, explains it as follows: "Most brands aim to be customer-centric, but many approach market research by asking brand-centric questions.
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IPOs previously were added as part of Russell's annual index reconstitution process, which meant an IPO could wait nearly a year for inclusion.
1, and additional access areas will be added in early 2001, a plan unveiled Friday shows.
Reisman shows that the fact that the value of a loaf of bread equals the value of the flour required to produce it plus the value added by the baker in its production, does not entitle one to forget the value added by the baker and view the value of the bread as counting simply the value of the flour.
John Karavas added 13 points while Eric Geffner contributed 10 points, 10 rebounds, six steals and six assists for the Wolverines of North Hollywood (16-4, 7-0), who went 12 of 21 from the 3-point line.
Denny Lee, Chief Financial Officer, added, "While the competitive and market situation in the wireless value-added services market in China has led to weakness in our revenue in this area, NetEase continues to be on a solid financial footing, with diversified revenue streams and positive operating cash flow.
Their 11-point third-quarter lead was cut to four, in part due to the strong inside play of Kristin Nadas, who scored 13 of her game-high 22 points in the third quarter and also added 12 rebounds.
Instead of filled won tons, the won ton skins and other ingredients are added separately here to make a soup that is really quick and easy.
We've also added an Excel toolbar add-in and greatly expanded the number of applications from which users can capture editable text.
Tiana Jameson scored 14 points, Briana Kentfield added 11 and Christina Sanchez 10 as the Hart High girls' basketball team beat Burroughs 51-32 Friday.
The company has added more than 22 new customers this year.