adapt to

adapt (something) to (something)

1. To become familiar or comfortable with something. When used in this way, the phrase does not take a noun or pronoun between "adapt" and "to." When Fran moved to China, she struggled to adapt to her new surroundings.
2. To modify or adjust something to fit or work properly with something else. Brian had to buy special cables so that he could adapt his old VCR his new TV.
See also: adapt

adapt something to something

to convert something to fit or work with something else. We converted our furnace to natural gas.
See also: adapt

adapt to something

to adapt or get used to someone or something. Please try to adapt to our routine.
See also: adapt

adapt to

v.
1. To alter something so that it is better suited to something else: The immigrants adapted their recipes to the ingredients that were available in their new country.
2. To change in order to be better suited to something: At first, I didn't like the new school, but I quickly adapted to the way things were done there and was soon very happy.
See also: adapt
References in periodicals archive ?
This suggests there may be multiple different ways trees in a region can adapt to local climate.
Although stressing he wishes to be regarded as a striker, Rooney (pictured) says he can adapt to fill the needs of the team.
coli might be able to adapt to different environmental conditions.
"The study provides a clear picture of the impact of climate change, including what is likely to lie ahead in future, the areas that will be most affected, and what needs to be done now to prepare and adapt." Adrian Hilton, regional climate change coordinator, said: "Climate Change is a reality and we will all need to adapt to the impacts.
Designing a technology infrastructure that can support remote work and can easily accept and adapt to new advances is essential to the success of the work environment.
Students revealed the implications of changing group members to be (a) that one needed to accept, value, and adapt to new group members, (b) that communication was a key element in a change-based environment and brainstorming, debating, listening, negotiating, collaborating, and compromising were required, (c) that leadership was needed to guide the group through issues that arose due to change, and (d) that change had an impact on available time.
So perhaps, they suggest, "the best we can hope for is detente, a running standoff between science and the bugs' remarkable ability to adapt to their changing environment."
Spectrum Industries, in cooperation with the University of Wisconsin-Stout's Vocational Rehabilitation Institute, has created ADApt Lectern, an adjustable lectern designed to adapt to the physical requirements of each individual.
Glavin (2004; the third author of this article) differentiated between psychological tests, which represent an internal measurement of a specific personality trait, type, or competency, and psychosocial tests, which measure an individual's ability to adapt to the environment.
Only by seeing what they see will we be able to adapt to what is truly needed in the marketplace.
Upon acceptance, the students begin a rigorous schedule of rehearsals, and are expected to learn choreography quickly, as well as to adapt to the contrasting styles of their various guest choreographers.
"You also have to adapt to the harsh reality of doing business in Northern Ontario where we are losing a lot of our youth.
SMI-S' object orientation allows storage fabrics to adapt to changes in technology over time without blowing up the model and starting over again.
We've celebrated the flexibility of airpower and the capability of our global mobility forces to adapt to the exigencies of coalition operations and conduct the largest combat airborne insertion of forces since D-Day at Normandy.
I am confident that, based upon our ability to adapt to change in the past, we will do so in the future.