actress


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said the actress to the pope

An aside that is used to create a humorous but lewd sexual innuendo out of something mundane or innocent that someone else has said. (The use of "actress" is because the innuendo always refers to a woman in a sexual situation.) Primarily heard in UK. A: "Wow, that sandwich is huge!" B: "Yeah, I can barely put my hands around it." C: "Said the actress to the pope!"
See also: actress, pope, said

as the actress said to the pope

An aside that is used to create a humorous but lewd sexual innuendo out of something mundane or innocent that someone else has said. (The use of "actress" is because the innuendo always refers to a woman in a sexual situation.) Primarily heard in UK. A: "Wow, that sandwich is huge!" B: "Yeah, I can barely put my hands around it." C: "As the actress said to the pope!"
See also: actress, pope, said

as the actress said to the bishop

A humorous expression used to add a sexual connotation to an innocuous phrase. A: "Oh, I'm sorry, I didn't mean to touch you there." B: "As the actress said to the bishop!"
See also: actress, bishop, said

as the actress said to the bishop

used humorously to call attention to a sexual double entendre , especially an unintended one.
The cast of characters can be reversed without changing the meaning of the expression: as the bishop said to the actress .
2005 New Zealand Listener Some of Charles's antipodean witticisms— …‘it all became too big for me, as the actress said to the bishop’ – sounded several centuries old.
See also: actress, bishop, said

As the actress said to the bishop...

A phrase used to point out or emphasize that a remark had a risqué double meaning, whether or not it was intended. The phrase, first heard in Britain in the mid-20th century, contrasts a worldly actress and a very proper clergyman to whom such double meanings had to be pointed out. It also took the form of “as the bishop said to the actress,” “as the schoolmaster said to the schoolgirl,” and any number of other combinations. Mae West's repartees, such as replying to a man's saying, “I've heard so much about you” with “Yeah, but you can't prove it,” coming from almost anyone else would qualify for an “As the actress said to the bishop . . .”
See also: actress, said
References in periodicals archive ?
In the recount, Aghdashloo won Best Supporting Actress with 27 percent of the revote, while Zellweger was voted last of the five contestants with 14 percent of the vote.
Fittingly, it is also the setting for many of the essays in Letters, an extended correspondence with a fictional young painter, BZ, who has won the actress's mentorship through an auction.
Actress Betty Grable was one of the first celebrities to have her famous legs insured for $1 million, thus coining the phrase "million-dollar legs." Dancer Fred Astaire soon followed suit with a $75,000-per-leg insurance policy protection.
Being smart, grounded and real isn't a trend with teen actresses. "There's a lot of competition in Hollywood, and people get snippy," Michelle says.
With this solid base of talent, Sennett's Keystone Studios soon built a reputation as the silent screen's foremost comedy mill, launching the careers of such comic geniuses as Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd, Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle and, of course, Mabel Normand, the best comic actress of her time.
She was followed by Love Actually actress Keira Knightley, 19, who polled 21pc.
"What happens quite frequently is I get a call from a casting director in London who is kind of desperate because he or she can't find the right actress," says casting director Sylvie Brochere, who cast de France in "Around the World" and de la Boulaye in "Allen vs.
* Actress Diane Keaton was in her 50s when she adopted two children as a lone parent;
CELEBRITIES: Baroness (Ruth)Rendellof Babergh, crime novelist, 74; Barry Humphries,alias Dame Edna Everage, 70; Julia McKenzie,actress, 63; Gene Pitney, singer, 63; Renee Russo,actress, 50; Lou Diamond Phillips,actor,42; Michael Jordan,basketball player,41; Michael Bay,film director, 39; Michelle Forbes, actress, 37; Denise Richards, actress, 33.
Official respectability in the form of Legion of Honor awards first went to an actress in 1888 (but only for her charitable work) and to another for her actual theatrical efforts in 1904.
Actress Emily Watson, 36: One of Britain's most highly-acclaimed young actresses, Emily Watson was born in Islington, London, and graduated in English from Bristol University.
WATCHING the Oscars on television and seeing Halle Berry, the first black actress ever to win the best actress Oscar, and her moving acceptance speech, will be remembered by many for a long time.
Made with American money but packed with British talent, Shakespeare In Love gained nominations for best picture, best actress, best supporting actor, best supporting actress, best director and best original screenplay, as well as seven technical categories.
Dusky Maidens: The Odyssey of the Early Black Dramatic Actress. Westport: Greenweed, 1992.