act of God


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act of God

A natural disaster, or any similar large-scale event beyond human control. I don't care about a little rain—only an act of God will keep us from getting married today. There is no way to prepare for a sudden act of God like an earthquake.
See also: act, god, of

an act of God

an occurrence or an event for which no human is responsible; an act of nature such as a storm, an earthquake, or a wildfire. Will your insurance com­ pany pay for damage caused by earthquakes and other acts of God?
See also: act, god, of

act of God

An unforeseen and uncontrollable natural event, such as a hurricane, fire, or flood. For example, The publisher shall publish the work within twelve months except in case of delay caused by acts of God such as fires or floods or other circumstances beyond its control . It most often appears in legal contracts, where it is used to indemnify one party against a disaster that prevents it from carrying out the contract's terms. [Mid-1800s]
See also: act, god, of

an act of God

An act of God is an event that is beyond human control, especially one in which something is damaged or someone is hurt. The President described the disaster as an act of God. The manmade financial crisis came on top of an act of God, a terrible winter of heavy snowfall and ice. Note: This expression is sometimes used in legal documents such as insurance documents.
See also: act, god, of

act of God

an instance of uncontrollable natural forces in operation.
This phrase is often used in insurance contracts to refer to incidents such as lightning strikes or floods.
See also: act, god, of

an ˌact of ˈGod

(law) an event caused by natural forces which people cannot control or prevent, for example a hurricane (= a very strong wind), an earthquake, etc: The insurance covers your house against all types of damage, excluding those caused by acts of God.
See also: act, god, of
References in periodicals archive ?
applying the same precedents, are entirely consistent with act of God
Rellosa attributed the swelling number of vehicles insured against floods under Act of God or Act of Nature coverage to the heightened awareness of such risks in the aftermath of Tropical Storm "Ondoy," which hit Metro Manila on Sept.
"If the insurers wouldn't pay out (act of God) then I would regard the matter as closed.The suggestion that just because someone can afford a foreign holiday is too highly paid is quite frankly absurd.
Essentially, an Act of God clause will allow insurers to deny liability for an event such as a volcanic eruption.
The once-for-all act of God, embedded in the doctrine of justification, should enable us to perceive that that which has happened for us has happened for all human beings and indeed for the whole creation.
The NCOIL measure would codify a five-year limit on information that may be used from claims databases, require that claims and loss-inquiry information not be the sole factor in refusing to issue or non-renew a policy, and that a single claim arising from a natural catastrophe or "Act of God" could not justify taking action unless the insurer could show that reasonable actions were not taken, Bissett said.
When Steve's fishing boat is struck by lightning, the insurance company refuse to pay up, saying it's an Act Of God.
His insurance company refuses to pay, declaring it an Act of God.
Hibees boss Alex McLeish said: "This is a bitter disappointment for us but it was an act of God and nothing could be done."
Jesus' resurrection was the act of God in defense of the son, unjustly condemned by people.
If spontaneous abortions are "an act of God"--to use the common expression--is it not strange that God has so little concern for fetal life that he allows so much of it to go to waste without intervening?
'If peace eludes us, it is not an act of God, but, our making.
AN ACT of God - that's how many will describe Thursday's disaster when near-hurricane force winds combined with an exceptionally high tide again saw parts of the North Wales coast inundated by the sea.
FILM The Man Who Sued God (C5, 11pm) When insurers tell a forlorn fisherman the destruction of his boat was an act of God he decides to sue the Almighty.
Then praise be to whomsoever, the Pope decides to visit Cofton Park and suddenly like a miracle or an act of God, hordes of lorries and machinery appear, the road surface is chewed up and dispatched to the nether regions, huge ranks of free growing hedges have been shorn like Samson of their finery, light now pours into houses that were in semi-permanent darkness.