acknowledge

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acknowledge (one) as (something)

To publicly announce or accept that one possesses certain qualities or has attained a specific achievement or result. All she wanted was for her old boss to finally acknowledge her as the new director of the organization. The dissidents refused to acknowledge the new leader as legitimate.
See also: acknowledge

acknowledge (one) to be right

To publicly announce or accept that one is correct in some position, action, or statement. After a lengthy interview with investigators, the suspect acknowledged the witness to be right. The finance department acknowledged Henry to be right about the accounting error.
See also: acknowledge, right

acknowledge (the) receipt of (something)

To recognize, often formally, that something has been received, usually an item that has been delivered. Jason signed a form to acknowledge the receipt of the letter. Did you get a notification acknowledging receipt of your package?
See also: acknowledge, of, receipt

acknowledge the corn

To admit to or acknowledge one's fault, shortcoming, mistake, crime, or naiveté. When they arrested me, I decided I might as well acknowledge the corn and confess to stealing the car. Especially since I was still driving it.
See also: acknowledge, corn

acknowledge someone as something

to agree or announce publicly that a person holds a particular office or station, or that a person has particular qualities. She found it difficult to acknowledge herself as a failure.
See also: acknowledge

acknowledge someone to be right

to admit or state that someone is correct about something. Bill said that the car was useless, and the mechanic acknowledged him to be right.
See also: acknowledge, right

acknowledge something as something

to agree or announce publicly that something is as previously stated. The president acknowledged the statement as the truth.
See also: acknowledge

acknowledge (the) receipt of something

to report receiving something, such as a package, letter, or notice. The company acknowledged receipt of the merchandise I returned.
See also: acknowledge, of, receipt
References in periodicals archive ?
In the 1990s, most people realize it is socially desirable to give lip-service to acknowledging diversity.
Ancestral memory simply means acknowledging and incorporating a form of consciousness that has roots in a sacred cosmos and psychology that is holistic and multidimensional.
Shewbridge said that TEI is on the record acknowledging that abusive products are being developed and sold.
After acknowledging his wrongdoing, David accepts the consequences of his sins.
Several LCDT dancers have now joined Rambert, so Bruce was acknowledging their Graham-based lineage in the Cohan piece, just as he acknowledged his own debt to Tudor with Dark Elegies.
* A MANAGEMENT representation letter specifically acknowledging that the company is responsible for fairly presenting the financial statements was important evidence for CPAs in another suit.
While acknowledging that "we have had damaged airplanes" due to Kapton flashovers, David Pielmeier, the Navy's top wiring engineer, said the service banned it in new planes because of concerns it would explode in combat, not in peacetime use.
Ottawa--By a vote of 153-68 the House of Commons on April 21, 2004, passed a Bloc Quebecois motion acknowledging the brutal treatment of Armenians by the Turks in the Ottoman Empire as an act of genocide and a crime against humanity.
The redactors inherited a tradition that had taken to acknowledging Others and Difference in ways no longer fully adequate to the complex sameness and difference" of the new Christian Empire (17).
Walker recognizes the African American and Native American strands of her ancestry, but has more difficulty acknowledging the white blood in her veins, the blood of her great-great-grandfather who raped an eleven-year-old slave - Walker's great-great-grandmother.
Unlike Wilson, Hume and Smith were sharply aware of the gulf between acknowledging that human beings are moved by various moral sentiments and ascribing to them a moral sense.
While acknowledging his basic civil rights to freedom of religion and freedom of speech, critics of Mr Kempling say he should be denied these rights in this circumstance, holding that because he is in a position of authority, his views are problematic to his workplace.
Indeed, implicitly acknowledging Greenblatt's work, Randall calls his first chapter "A Case of Cultural Poetics," but seems to take that term to mean searching out a text's allusions to contemporary political events, which is not exactly what Greenblatt meant when he coined it.
Without acknowledging debates about Dutch "realism," Slive celebrates it as uncomplicated and self-evident.