acid

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come the acid

To be unpleasant or offensive, usually due to speaking in a caustic or sarcastic manner. Often followed by "with (someone)." Don't come the acid with me, son, or I'll knock you upside the head. I try to avoid her whenever I can, for she's far too quick to come the acid.
See also: acid, come

put the acid on (someone)

To beg, importune, or proposition (someone) for something, such as a money loan, a favor (sexual or otherwise), or information. Primarily heard in Australia, New Zealand. My no-account brother-in-law is always putting the acid on for a money loan—which, I'll add, he has never once paid back. It's like he's surprised when women in a random bar don't all come up putting the acid on him.
See also: acid, on, put

be on acid

To be under the influence of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), a powerful psychedelic drug commonly known as "acid." A lot of my friends like being on acid, but it just makes me feel really tense and paranoid.
See also: acid, on

on acid

Under the influence of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), a powerful psychedelic drug commonly known as "acid." The man was reportedly on acid when claimed he could fly and tried to jump off the building.
See also: acid, on

acid test

A conclusive test. The phrase comes from the 19th-century practice of testing metals in nitric acid to determine if they contained gold. Restructuring the organization will be the acid test that determines whether or not it can survive the sudden downturn in the economy.
See also: acid, test

acid test

Fig. a test whose findings are beyond doubt or dispute. The senator doesn't look too popular just now, but the acid test will be if he gets reelected.
See also: acid, test

acid test

A decisive trial to determine worth or quality, as in Exposure to brilliant sunlight is the acid test for showing this fabric won't fade. Alluding to a 19th-century chemical test for distinguishing gold from other metals, this term was used figuratively by the early 1900s.
See also: acid, test

the acid test

COMMON If you call something the acid test, it will prove how effective or useful something is. The acid test for the vaccine will be its performance in the south where the disease is more widespread. So far, I don't feel too bad but I'm waiting for my first really stressful day when things go wrong. That will be the real acid test. Note: Nitric acid can be used to test whether a metal is pure gold because it damages most metals but does not affect gold.
See also: acid, test

the acid test

a situation or event which finally proves whether something is good or bad, true or false, etc.
The original use of the phrase was to describe a method of testing for gold with nitric acid (gold being resistant to the effects of nitric acid).
1990 Which? These deals are designed to encourage impulse buying, so the acid test is whether you would have bought anyway.
See also: acid, test

come the acid

be unpleasant or offensive; speak in a caustic or sarcastic manner.
See also: acid, come

put the acid on someone

try to extract a loan or favour from someone. Australian & New Zealand informal
See also: acid, on, put, someone

the ˌacid ˈtest (of something)

(also the ˈlitmus test especially in American English ) a situation which finally proves whether something is good or bad, true or false, etc: They’ve always been good friends, but the acid test will come when they have to share a flat.Both these expressions originally referred to chemical tests. The acid test uses nitric acid to test if something is made of gold. The litmus test uses litmus paper to test for acids and alkalis.
See also: acid, test

acid

n. lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). (Drugs.) Freddy got hold of some bad acid and freaked out.
References in periodicals archive ?
Feminism has become the ladies' auxiliary of the parents' rights movement," Burkett writes acidly, "and the words woman and mother have become synonymous once again.
Indeed one contributor, Barbara Ravelhofer, quoting from Howard's dissertation and an early article, acidly remarks that there is more to the subject "than a binary opposition between thrusting phallocrats 'relentlessly' penetrating 'the air' and victimized female performers involuntarily flashing their 'orgiastic feet'.
premiere of her Zweiland, a dark, acidly humorous snapshot of some psychological divisions that persist in unified Germany.
We are seeing real trade liberalization on the west side of the Pacific," said Australia's foreign affairs minister, acidly.
The first philosopher responded acidly, "Come on, this is serious.
Boies' demolition job on the Microsoft witness was so complete that when Microsoft counsel Michael Lacovara stepped up for his final examination of Rosen, Judge Jackson commented acidly, "It's always inspiring to watch young people embark on heroic endeavors.
This kind of bias burns acidly on the pages of Team Rodent, but since Hiaasen adheres to the strictest journalistic standards in disclosing his personal hatred, and since the book never pretends to be anything but a literary hit and run, it feels okay.
He retorts acidly, "Can one reader be forgiven, if during such passages, there runs into his mind something unmistakably like a wild horse laugh?
A historian of those times described them acidly as "those who have turned the world upside down.
We should not underestimate the scale of achievement," Chomsky writes acidly.
He acidly refutes the arguments for "Islamic science" put forward by Maurice Buccaille, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, and Ziauddin Sardar.
As new mother contributor Ella Jean Earl said acidly to me this morning, "I clothed my kids with these so called handicrafts.
acidly notes, with particular reference to some recent discussions of Deut.
Knesset member Yossi Sarid, much quoted during the gulf war for saying that the Palestinians had let him down, commented acidly that, having for years demanded a local substitute for Arafat, Shamir and Sharon were now demanding a substitute for Faisal Husseini.
She observed acidly in October 1902: "It is part of the weariness of Halifax life, this constant explaining it to new people and apologising for its deficiencies--for of course, in contrast to the comfort of English life, there are no deficiencies.