accept

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accept (something) as (something)

1. To take or recognize something as performing a certain function, such as being a form of payment. I accept your offer to fix my car as reimbursement for the money you owe me. Please accept these flowers as my apology.
2. To acknowledge something as existing in a certain state, such as being true. If he ever wants this situation resolved, he needs to accept Mary's story as the truth. You need to accept this as reality, and move on.
See also: accept

accept (something) as gospel

To believe that something is absolutely true without any hesitation or reservations. When we're growing up, we accept what our parents tell us as gospel. The beloved professor's opinions on the subject are accepted as gospel by his students.
See also: accept, gospel

accept a wooden nickel

To accept something that proves to be fraudulent or deceitful; to be swindled or conned. Primarily heard in US. I'm done accepting wooden nickels—capricious women who say they love me, then get bored and decide I'm not worth their time. My husband is a wonderful man, but he has about as much business sense as a grade-schooler. If I had let him accept all the wooden nickels offered flaky customers have tried to peddle on us, we'd have gone bankrupt years ago.
See also: accept, nickel, wooden

don't take any wooden nickels

Take care and, specifically, try not to get swindled. The phrase is thought to have originated in the early 20th century when country residents visiting the city were considered easily duped. Primarily heard in US. Have fun tonight and don't take any wooden nickels!
See also: any, nickel, take, wooden

I can accept that

I believe or agree with what you are saying. A: "But I'd like for you to get some more training in Excel." B: "I can accept that—I'm really only familiar with the basic functions."
See also: accept, can, that

I can't accept that

I don't believe or agree with what you are saying. They said Amanda was more qualified for the promotion than I am, but I can't accept that, knowing that I've had more training than her.
See also: accept, that
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

accept someone as something

to consent to receive or consider someone as a particular type of person or a person who can serve a particular role. Sally finally accepted herself as the only possible peacemaker in the dispute.
See also: accept

accept something as something

 
1. to agree that something will serve in payment of a debt or in return for something. This receipt shows that we have accepted your money as payment on your debt. This money has been accepted as reimbursement for the expenditure.
2. to resign [oneself] to something that cannot be changed. I must accept what you say as the final decision.
See also: accept

I can accept that.

Inf. I accept your evaluation as valid. Bob: Now, you'll probably like doing the other job much better. It doesn't call for you to do the things you don't do well. Tom: I can accept that. Sue: On your evaluation this time, I noted that you need to work on telephone manners a little bit. Bill: I can accept that.
See also: accept, can, that

I can't accept that.

Inf. I do not believe what you said.; I reject what you said. Sue: The mechanic says we need a whole new engine. John: What? I can't accept that! Tom: You're now going to work on the night shift. You don't seem to be able to get along with some of the people on the day shift. Bob: I can't accept that. It's them, not me.
See also: accept, that

receive something from some place

to get and accept something from some place. I just received a letter from Budapest! Mary received a package from Japan.
See also: place, receive
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

accept a wooden nickel

be fooled or swindled. US
A wooden nickel is a worthless or counterfeit coin.
See also: accept, nickel, wooden
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

don’t take any wooden ˈnickels

(American English) used when saying goodbye to somebody to mean ‘be careful’, ‘take care of yourself’: Well, see you around Tom. Don’t take any wooden nickels.
See also: any, nickel, take, wooden
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

don't take any wooden nickels

Protect yourself (against fraud, loss, and so on). This warning against counterfeit coins dates from about 1900 and is distinctly American in origin, the nickel being a U.S. or Canadian five-cent coin. Why a wooden coin was selected is not known. Presumably making coins of wood would always have been more expensive than the intrinsic value of metal coins. Several writers suggest it replaced don’t take any wooden nutmegs, a now obsolete saying dating from colonial times when sharp traders sold wooden nutmegs mixed in with the real spice. In print the expression is found in Ring Lardner’s story, The Real Dope (1919), “In the mean wile—until we meet again—don’t take no wood nickles [sic] and don’t get impatient and be a good girlie.”
See also: any, nickel, take, wooden
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

Don't take any wooden nickels

Don't let yourself be cheated. This expression was first heard in the early 20th century. Although there never were any wooden nickels as legal tender, country folk going to a city were likely to be cheated by all manner of ruses, including obviously counterfeit coins. Wooden nickels did exist, however, as bank promotions during and after the Great Depression; the “coins” were redeemable for prizes.
See also: any, nickel, take, wooden
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in periodicals archive ?
OICs accepted based on doubt as to collectibility when there has also been a determination that, although an amount greater than the amount offered could be collected, collection of more than the amount offered would create economic hardship.
They don't accept that candidates can, and increasing numbers will, behave exactly like employers when making employment decisions.
The white tester was told that the store did not normally accept out-of-state checks.
Normally, the IRS does not accept less than the tax due, unless the taxpayer can convince the Service that the offer is in the government's best interest.
Ronald 'Bato' Dela Rosa on Monday said he accepted gifts such as expensive Lacoste shirts during Christmas and lechon when he was chief of the PNP.
"Want Collaboration?: Accept and Actively Manage Conflict." Harvard Business Review; March 2005
Numerous "vehicle donation programs" will gladly accept most towable vehicles.
Penny Culliton accepts the award for Akira Isogawa.
On the seventh question: Abu Rayhan said: If you accept this as a given that the east of the heaven is the right, then the heaven ought to be all right and all left at the same time, because the east of each position is simultaneously the west of another; and it is inappropriate for one thing in one condition to be called by two names of opposite meaning.
The differences in the accept fraction should be taken into account when a new quality control system is developed.
(ENI)--The Church of England will be "increasingly isolated and anachronistic" unless it accepts women as bishops, a house of bishops working party which looked into the issue of women in the episcopate has concluded.
1271 may be implicated any time a creditor accepts less than full value for a debt or a portion thereof.
When a corporate tax manager accepts absolute responsibility for the actions of his or her department, he or she will find it necessary to organize the tax department in a manner that eliminates errors and ethical violations.
Judas' preoccupation with money reaches its nadir when he accepts thirty pieces of silver from the chief priests to betray Christ.
The program also accepts oil containers for recycling and includes institutional, industrial and commercial volumes, as well as those generated by the do-it-yourselfer.