acceptable losses

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acceptable losses

Destruction or casualties that are considered reasonable because they happen in the context of a war or military attack. The general considered the destruction of the tanks to be acceptable losses since his soldiers returned from the mission alive and uninjured. Many would argue that any lost lives should not be considered acceptable losses
See also: acceptable, loss
References in periodicals archive ?
Renewal rates, he says, are generally flat to low single-digit reductions for accounts with acceptable loss history.
The responses from people on the street were predictably flippant with numbers of 100, 50 and so on being offered up as an acceptable loss of life.
The life of the boy in the photograph I keep returning to is an acceptable loss for both sides.
However, we believe losing a small amount of money per hectare - around PS2 or PS3 - is an acceptable loss to secure a huge gain for smaller uplands farms.
Lastly, you repeat this process until you succeed, no longer want to continue, exceed your acceptable loss or prove it can't be done.
Issues range from reconsidering non-combatant immunity to reassessing how we calculate proportionality in terms of the scope of military responses and acceptable loss of innocent life, to the defensibility of terrorism and humanitarian intervention.
Acceptable Loss A William Monk Novel | ANNE PERRY: AUG
And while company-wide barbecues may be an acceptable loss, there are some things that can't be cut, like workers' compensation insurance--by law, companies are required to have it.
Nobody likes losses, but blindly holding positions beyond your acceptable loss level is crazy.
The concept of an acceptable loss of life is hard for a civilized society to acknowledge, especially a society devoted to preserving and prolonging life.
To scale VoIP across an entire enterprise, the LAN must be able to provide low latencies and acceptable loss rates in the face of bursts of data traffic.
Risk management programs should be developed and implemented within an organizational context: Each institution will need to define its own "worry radius"--the context that provides definitions of perceived risk and acceptable loss.
Manufacturer's Link Budget: Link loss budgets define the amount of acceptable loss within nodes on a DWDM network.
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