accept as

accept (something) as

1. To take or recognize something as performing a certain function, such as being a form of payment. I accept your offer to fix my car as reimbursement for the money you owe me. Please accept these flowers as my apology.
2. To acknowledge something as existing in a certain state, such as being true. If he ever wants this situation resolved, he needs to accept Mary's story as the truth. You need to accept this as reality, and move on.
See also: accept

accept someone as something

to consent to receive or consider someone as a particular type of person or a person who can serve a particular role. Sally finally accepted herself as the only possible peacemaker in the dispute.
See also: accept

accept something as something

 
1. to agree that something will serve in payment of a debt or in return for something. This receipt shows that we have accepted your money as payment on your debt. This money has been accepted as reimbursement for the expenditure.
2. to resign [oneself] to something that cannot be changed. I must accept what you say as the final decision.
See also: accept
References in classic literature ?
You accept as perfectly legitimate the author's account of the secret thoughts of the heroine, and yet all the time you know that the heroine was alone when thinking these thoughts, and that neither the author nor any one else was capable of hearing them.
Trees, painted on flat cardboard and stuck up on each side of the stage, we accept as a forest.
I shall ask you to accept a little present from me, among the other offerings that are made to you before the wedding day.-- R.M."
The question is only whether Catholics are required to accept as a matter of faith that women cannot be ordained.
Do I answer by saying that this is indeed a matter of faith, and that all those who cannot accept it must accept as a consequence that they are no longer Catholics and should not receive the Body of Christ in Communion?