abide

(redirected from abides)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms.

abide by a decision

To accept, follow, and comply with a decision, especially that which is handed down by a judge. Though it stings my dignity, I have to abide by the court's decision to not allow me to drive a car for the next 12 months.
See also: abide, decision

abide by

To obey something, usually an established rule. Because Donna refuses to abide by her parents' rules, I worry that she'll be told to move out of their house.
See also: abide

abide with

To stay or remain with someone. If you would like to rest for a while, you can abide with me.
See also: abide

abide by something

to follow the rules of something; to obey someone's orders. John felt that he had to abide by his father's wishes.
See also: abide

abide with someone

to remain with someone; to stay with someone. (Old and stilted. Primarily heard in the church hymn Eventide.) You are welcome to abide with me for a while, young man.
See also: abide

can't stand (the sight of) someone or something

 and can't stomach someone or something
Fig. [to be] unable to tolerate someone or something; disliking someone or something extremely. (Also with cannot.) I can't stand the sight of cooked carrots. Mr. Jones can't stomach the sight of blood. None of us can stand this place. Nobody can stand Tom when he smokes a cigar.
See also: stand

abide by

Accept and act in accordance with a decision or set of rules; also, remain faithful to. For example, All members must agree to abide by the club regulations, or A trustworthy man abides by his word. An older sense of the verb abide, "remain," is still familiar in the well-known 19th-century hymn "Abide with Me," which asks God to stay with the singer in time of trouble. [Early 1500s]
See also: abide

can't stand

Also, can't abide or bear or stomach . Thoroughly dislike; be unable to put up with something or someone. For example, I can't stand the sight of her; she's obnoxious, or I can't bear to leave the country, or I can't stomach a filthy kitchen. The oldest of these synonymous expressions is can't abide, which Shakespeare used in 2 Henry IV (3:2): "She could not abide Master Shallow." Can't stand dates from the early 1600; can't bear dates from about 1700 and often but not always is used with an infinitive; can't stomach dates from the late 1600s and today is less common than the others.
See also: stand

abide by

To conform to; comply with: abide by the rules.
See also: abide
References in periodicals archive ?
This collaboration with Abide Therapeutics illustrates our ongoing commitment to enable potentially disruptive technologies in the hands of talented drug hunters, here deployed in unique and powerful approach to target a validated but largely underexplored class of serine hydrolases," said Thomas Daniel, M.
Practices of discernment invite us to abide in Christ and follow wherever he leads, whatever the cost.
We never leave the Vine, or we really will wither and burn out; we never cease needing to be loved and to abide in that love.
We learn to abide in the Beloved, now and always, to be his Body in the heart of the world.
Jesus is Jesus because he is from God and abides with God, and the promise of Jesus is that through him we are brought into abiding with God.
In our preaching, how do we dare to imagine grace, and how do we preach it in such a way that it abides in our own hearts and the hearts of our communities?
At the times when I'm feeling the most impatient and the least able to abide, my thoughts turn to Jeffrey "the Dude" Lebowski, the quintessential slacker and bighearted antihero of Joel and Ethan Coens' film The Big Lebowski.
Perhaps the greatest lesson I've learned (from that dude Jesus) in what it means to abide is something I'm in the middle of right now.