abet

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Related to abets: abetters

abet (someone) in

To help someone in an activity, usually an illegal one. If you drove the robber's getaway car, then you abetted him in a crime! Everyone thinks you abetted Connie in starting this rumor.
See also: abet

aid and abet

To assist someone, usually in a mischievous or illegal activity. Gary was arrested and charged with aiding and abetting the jewelry thief. I know other kids aided and abetted Paul in egging our house—he's just the only one who got caught.
See also: abet, aid, and

abet someone in something

to help someone in some deed; to help someone do something illegal. Surely you do not expect me to abet you in this crime!
See also: abet

aid and abet someone

Cliché to help someone; to incite someone to do something, possibly something that is wrong. (Originally a legal phrase.) He was scolded for aiding and abetting the boys who were fighting.
See also: abet, aid, and

aid and abet

FORMAL
If someone aids and abets another person, they help or encourage them to do something criminal or wrong. His wife was sentenced to seven years imprisonment for aiding and abetting him. Note: This expression is often used in legal contexts.
See also: abet, aid, and

aid and abet

help and encourage someone to do something wrong, especially to commit a crime.
Abet comes from an Old French term meaning ‘to encourage a hound to bite’.
1986 Frank Peretti This Present Darkness She strained to think of…any friend who would still aid and abet a fugitive from the law, without questions.
See also: abet, aid, and

aid and abet, to

To assist and promote or encourage something or someone. The pairing of these nearly synonymous verbs, always in this order, comes from criminal law, where it denotes helping, facilitating and promoting the commission of a crime. The verbs themselves are quite old, aid dating from about 1400 and abet from about 1300. Although the term still is principally used in relation to criminal actions, it gradually crept into more general speech, as in “The influx of Canada geese on the golf course, aided and abetted by people feeding them . . .”
See also: aid, and
References in periodicals archive ?
we find that no consensus exists for imposing liability on those who knowingly (but not purposefully) aid and abet a violation of international law.
and M.P., pleaded not guilty and said they did not aid or abet the 33-year-old.
The Sixtieth Congress shortened the aiding and abetting statute in 1909: "Whoever directly commits any act constituting an offense defined in any law of the United States, or aids, abets, counsels, commands, induces, or procures its commission, is a principal." (40) Congress later codified the exact wording of the 1909 statute in 18 U.S.C.
("Whoever commits an offense against the United States or aids, abets, counsels, commands, induces or procures its commission, is punishable as a principal.").
[E]very person who shall knowingly and intentionally aid or abet any person in the commission of any such felony, or attempt to do any act hereby made felony ...
The language of the bill would hold liable anyone who "intentionally abets, induces or procures" copyright infringement.
People sticking to the diet also averaged lower blood concentrations of fibrinogen, a protein that abets dotting; white blood cells, a sign of inflammation; and homocysteine, an amino acid implicated in heart disease.
Its counterpart, thromboxane, abets clotting and constricts vessels.