a whole bunch

a whole bunch

A lot. I liked that movie a whole bunch—it was great. He says that he likes me a whole bunch, but not enough to date me, apparently.
See also: bunch, whole

a whole bunch

and whole bunches
mod. a whole lot; very much. (Always with a in the singular.) I like to spend evenings at home a whole bunch. Tom likes Mary whole bunches, but she thinks he’s a dork.
See also: bunch, whole
References in periodicals archive ?
We've bred a whole bunch of these self-important clowns, from the marginally well known - hello, Sally Bercow, Mr Speaker's publicity-crazy wife - to ordinary punters who enjoy kidding themselves they're part of some cyber in-crowd, an electronic elite who are really, really in the know.
It's relatively small- it sports 220 pounds of wet plant material, and you can imagine how much one fruit tree or a whole bunch of tomato plants would weigh by comparison- but it consumes carbon dioxide, spits out oxygen, and produces produces about 13 gallons of drinkable water every day (in a working extraterrestrial garden, water would largely come from crew members' urine).
One was going out and one was coming in, for a whole bunch of years.
He gave me a whole bunch of different jobs in the years that I was there.
I have a special needs daughter, Hannah, and they know I raise a whole bunch of money for people with special needs.
My mom went through a couple of divorces and marriages, and I had a whole bunch of stepfathers and fathers.
It's something I think is really important because, well, I'm very lucky to have a supportive family, but I think it's a good thing to be able to randomly write a whole bunch of opinions that maybe you can't say out loud.
You do the Daily Office, Gregorian chant, pray a whole bunch, and work.
That's going to take a whole bunch more work," Stone points out.
Then I think that Mickey is right, that you would have a whole bunch more two-parent families forming.
I remember Pat Buchanan used to say at the White House, "Chuck, when are you going to get one state to quit welfare cold turkey?" I tried to point out to him that it wasn't quite that easy, that there were a whole bunch of people out there who had gotten used to welfare, and that there had to be some kind of a weaning process.
The answer is two-fold: One, a whole bunch of people aren't going to show up to take these jobs, because there's a massive underground economy out there.
Murray: To what extent, Mickey, are there a whole bunch of public-service jobs of the 1930s WPA type that could be created?