a stone's throw


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Related to a stone's throw: a stone's throw away

(just) a stone's throw (from something)

A short distance away from something. The shore house is a stone's throw from the ocean! Brett wanted a shorter commute, so he moved to a house that is a stone's throw from his job.
See also: throw

a stone's throw

A short distance away from something. The shore house is a stone's throw from the ocean! Brett wanted a shorter commute, so he moved to a house that is just a stone's throw away from his job.
See also: throw
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

(just) a stone's throw

(from something) Go to within a stone's throw (of something).
See also: throw
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

stone's throw, a

A very short distance, as in They live just a stone's throw from us. This metaphoric term alludes to how far one can toss a stone. [Second half of 1500s]
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a stone's throw

COMMON If you describe one place as a stone's throw from another, you mean that the first place is very close to the second. His office is a stone's throw away from Westminster. The cellars are within a stone's throw of the church where Dom Pérignon, the legendary creator of champagne, was buried.
See also: throw
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

a stone's throw

a short distance.
1989 Joanna Trollope Village Affairs Can't tell you the difference it will make, having you a stone's throw away.
See also: throw
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

a ˈstone’s throw

a very short distance: We’re just a stone’s throw from the shops.
See also: throw
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

stone's throw, a

A short distance. Strictly speaking, of course, this measurement would depend on the size and weight of the stone and the strength of the thrower. However, the expression has been used loosely since the sixteenth century. A. Hall had it in a 1581 translation of the Iliad: “For who can see a stones throw of ought thing in land or plaine?”
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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