rite of passage

(redirected from a rite of passage)

rite of passage

An event or activity often performed or experienced as part of passing from one stage of life to another. Bar Mitzvah celebrations are a rite of passage as Jewish boys become men. Getting lost while trying to find their classrooms is kind of a rite of passage for freshmen at this school.
See also: of, passage, rite

rite of passage

a ceremony or event marking an important stage in someone's life, especially birth, initiation, marriage, and death.
See also: of, passage, rite
References in periodicals archive ?
When a woman gives birth to her child, she experiences the culmination of a rite of passage (Davis-Floyd, 1992; Schneider, 2012).
Both A Long Way Gone and Little Soldier represent and test a common social assumption: that war can serve as a rite of passage to maturity and can accelerate the transition from childhood to adulthood.
Describing a rite of passage as a major change in one's life that comes with often contrasting and confusing emotions, Silke asserts that "Victims of abuse are forced to undergo a distorted rite of passage.
Requiring kids to register would add weight to the idea of voting as a rite of passage to adulthood and as a citizen's duty, rather than merely an option to be exercised at one's own discretion.
This difference in generational interpretations demonstrates, in part, that First Communion succeeded as a rite of passage more from the children's, than from the adults', point of view," she writes.
The task of choreographing and performing Swan Lake is also a rite of passage.
It's a rite of passage for many expectant parents: showing off fuzzy images from the first ultrasound exam.
The lifemask is a rite of passage for all recipients of the award.
Hospitals have also gradually become the places where most of the population are born and many die, yet it took a great deal of protest -- mainly from women in the 1970s and '80s -- to turn the maternity hospital from an emergency ward into a place fit to celebrate a rite of passage, a normal birth being no sickness but a joy.
Drawing on Turner's notion of communitas, Teather suggests that such liminality exists in spaces where people celebrate rites of passage which `for the contemporary citizen in a wealthy post-modern society, [can be seen as] a process of personal transformation, sometimes revelatory, sometimes agonising, sometimes fun, sometimes requiring a prolonged period of preparation of endurance more like a campaign than a rite of passage, sometimes a lonely, personal experience but sometimes one experienced in the company of another or others' (p.
Broken down into its most basic elements, a rite of passage involves (1) a separation from society, (2) preparation or instruction from an elder, (3) a transition (in the case of adolescence, from child to adult), and (4) a welcoming back into society with acknowledgement of the adolescent's changed status.
Has recreational drug use become a rite of passage for gay men and lesbians?
Traversing the labyrinth between "Will you Marry me" and "I do" is a rite of passage every betrothed couple encounters on the way to "happily ever after.
I asked myself, 'Is it a rite of passage for UCLA just to win a national championship every year?
It's a rite of passage, a formal marker of the passage of a young woman into adulthood.