a mad rush

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mad rush

A wild, frantic hurry to go somewhere or to obtain something. I love watching all the students in a mad rush to get to their classes after the bell. Shoppers across the country are always in a mad rush to pick up products at staggeringly low prices on Black Friday. Let's stop off somewhere for lunch—there's no mad rush to get to the airport.
See also: mad, rush

a mad rush

COMMON A mad rush is when people try to go somewhere or do something very quickly, in an uncontrolled way. There was a mad rush to avoid being left behind. The bomb landed in the middle of the dance floor causing panic and a mad rush for the doors.
See also: mad, rush
References in periodicals archive ?
He said: "The Bank Holiday was just the start of the new rules and it is pleasing in some ways that we did not have a mad rush as it may mean people are properly researching their options before making these Re important decisions."
Summary: It was a mad rush of job-seekers at the World Trade Centre on Friday morning as thousands of applicants turned up for a mass-recruitment drive.
Summary: Millions of people are set to take to the roads on Thursday in a mad rush to get home for Christmas.
The five-speed transmission is very smooth, even when you're in a mad rush: The sporty factor on this sportwagon is considerable.
In its concluding remarks, the 9/11 Commission Report stated: "We look forward to a national debate on the merits of what we have recommended." However, there has been no national debate, only a one sided, pre-stacked harangue and a mad rush by the 9/11 Commission and its cohorts in the media, the White House, and the Congress.
There was a mad rush to get people trained and started in setting up trusts before the deadline."
I was in a mad rush to get to the bookies this morning, so I could only back one horse in the Old Newton Cup - Seb Sanders, I owe you one!