grain of truth

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grain of truth

A little bit of truth. Often used to refer to a small amount of insight or truth in something otherwise false or nonsensical. The only reason why Dave's joke about my love life bothered me so much is because there was a grain of truth to it.
See also: grain, of, truth

(a) grain of truth

even the smallest amount of truth. The attorney was unable to find a grain of truth in the defendant's testimony. If there were a grain of truth to your statement, I would trust you.
See also: grain, of, truth
References in classic literature ?
In those cynical words there was indeed a grain of truth.
BODYGUARD creator Jed Mercurio has said some of the fan theories about the conclusion of the show do have "a grain of truth".
The hit BBC sitcom satirising the inner workings of Whitehall and the so-called spads contains "more than a grain of truth", the head of the cross-party Public Administration Select Committee warned.
Spacey, 50, who serves as artistic director at the city's Old Vic theatre, is said to have taken Moss, 36, out to dinner earlier this month in a bid to convince her to take on a stage role.ut the 'American Beauty' star has insisted on his Twitter.com page that there's "not a grain of truth" in the rumours.
While some of the arguments against the income tax that Brian Doherty outlined in his article contain a grain of truth, the reality is that when taken in context none of them hold up in court.
There's more than a grain of truth in that wise prelate's words.
"Our club was being brought into disrepute by claims of supposed illegal tapping but there is not a grain of truth in it, not an ounce.
"None of them has a grain of truth. They have upset me and my family, but there has been nothing I can do about it until now.
"For years," he confides," I thought his story about jumping off the Space Needle in Seattle attached by just a Band-Aid to the end of a bungee cord within a promotional stunt for the Johnson & Johnson company might have a grain of truth to it somewhere" It turned out that Frazier was wrong on this one.
And while this particular set of numbers may not be as sociologically or statistically accurate as the magazine suggests, the general idea--that today's women have at least a few qualms about the brave new world of postfeminist "liberation"--seems, even by casual observation, to carry more than a grain of truth. How else to explain the huge box-office and bookstore popularity of Jane Austen and the Brontes with the twenty-something, Gen X crowd?