gator

(redirected from a gator)

later, gator

A shortening of the childish rhyme "see you later, alligator." Later, gator! I'll see you again next week A: "Bye Daddy, have a nice day at work!" B: "Later gator!"
See also: gator

gator

slang Remnants from a tire's tread, as found discarded on a roadway. So called because the treads resemble the scales of an alligator. Whoa, watch out for that gator in the middle of the road!

alligator

slang Remnants from a tire's tread, as found discarded on a roadway. So called because the treads resemble the scales of an alligator. Whoa, watch out for that alligator in the middle of the road!

alligator

and gator
n. a long, heavy, black segment of the outside of a tire, usually a truck tire, found on the highway. We dodged off onto the shoulder to avoid running over an alligator. A gator bashed in the bottom of my gas tank.

gator

verb

Later, gator

and L8R G8R
phr. & comp. abb. See you later, alligator. C U L8R G8R.
See also: gator
References in periodicals archive ?
Rana, in his final game as a Gator, grabbed 5 passes for 43 yards and a TD.
You won't realize how tough a gator's hide is until you fight one for 20 minutes and the snatch hook falls out the instant there's slack in the line.
Head to the Clark Road Gecko's on any fall Saturday and you'll see a grown man in voluminous feathered headdress and red and yellow war paint streaking his face, microphone to his lips, leading fellow members of the Sarasota Seminole Club in chants of "It's great to be a Gator hater."
Since a gator does not sweat, it passes off its body heat through an open mouth, much like a dog panting.
"I've had experienced hunters who have taken Africa's Big 5 completely freeze up on a gator and not shoot," Morrell said.
Several Amelia Island hotels are offering specials for the Gator Bowl: Amelia Hotel at the Beach is offering a Gator Bowl Special of $89 per night for two nights.
The bright red reflection of eyes indicated a gator was lurking, but more often than not, it was a small gator that I was happy to pass on.
Thirty-three alligators died and 13 more were euthanized when an epidemic caused by mycoplasma, the bacterial group responsible for pneumonia, swept through a gator farm in Florida in 1995.
This is the action a gator performs primarily when killing his prey or when aggressive danger is upon him.
In some parts of Florida it's an everyday thing to find a gator crossing the road in front of you, seeking refuge in your backyard swimming pool, or just basking in the sun on the banks of the nearest waterway.
Of course, some of your customers might go for a Gator Magnum or a concealed carry Gator-Lite.
That is, for large prey, such as deer, a gator clamps down with its close-set, spikelike teeth to leave a long line of perforations.
Alligator sightings are common in Florida and there are several instances when these reptiles are seen lurking in the neighborhood. However, it is rare a human comes in such close contact with a gator. About one-quarter of the estimated 5 million American gators living in the southeastern United States are found in Florida.
Indeed, Florida's Statewide Alligator Harvest Program has worked so well, hunters feverishly await the application periods every spring hoping to draw a permit and the accompanying pair of CITES tags required to possess a gator. In 2015, over 18,000 applicants vied for nearly 6,000 permits scattered across 133 Alligator Management Units (AMU's).