front runner

(redirected from a front-runner)

front runner

The person or thing most likely to be awarded something. I hear that movie is the front runner for the Best Picture Oscar. Amanda's the front runner for the position—she's overqualified, honestly, and has a great attitude.
See also: front, runner

front-runner

the person or thing thought most likely to win or succeed. The press found out some juicy secrets about the front-runner and made them all public. Who is the front-runner in the race to be governor?

front runner

n. the leader; the person or thing most likely to win. The press found out some juicy secrets about the front runner and made them all public.
See also: front, runner

front runner

Someone who is expected to win. The term comes from horse racing and began to be used figuratively in the first half of the 1900s. Its most prominent context is political, referring to a candidate who leads his or her opponents in an election, but it also occurs in other kinds of contest. Thus Wilbur Smith used it in Gold Mine (1970): “He had joined C.R.C. a mere twelve years previously and now he was the front runner.”
See also: front, runner