fair-weather friend

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fair-weather friend

Someone who remains a friend only when things are going well but abandons others during times of trouble or difficulty. I thought Allison and I had a strong friendship, but I learned she was just another fair-weather friend when she stopped talking to me after my divorce.
See also: friend
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

fair-weather friend

Fig. someone who is your friend only when things are pleasant or going well for you. Bill stayed for lunch but he wouldn't help me with the yard work. He's just a fair-weather friend. A fair-weather friend isn't much help in an emergency.
See also: friend
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fair-weather friend

A person who is dependable in good times but is not in times of trouble. For example, You can't rely on Sarah-she's strictly a fair-weather friend. This expression likens fair weather to good times. [Early 1700s]
See also: friend
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a fair-weather friend

someone who cannot be relied on in a crisis.
1998 Spectator The Americans gave up supplying gold on demand to other countries' central banks at £35 an ounce…when their fair-weather friends from London threatened to turn up and clean them out.
See also: friend
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

a ˌfair-weather ˈfriend

(disapproving) somebody who is only a friend when it is pleasant for them, and stops being a friend when you are in trouble: I really thought she’d be here to help me, but it seems that she’s just a fair-weather friend.
See also: friend
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

fair-weather friend

A friend who is faithful in good times but fails you in time of trouble. It is the opposite of a friend in need is a friend indeed. The transfer of “fair weather” to “good times” presumably occurred long before, but the adjectival application to a friend of dubious loyalty did not take place until the early eighteenth century.
See also: friend
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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