a dime a dozen


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

a dime a dozen

Ubiquitous; so abundant or common as to hold little or no value. In Los Angeles, waiters trying to become famous actors are a dime a dozen. That bird might be a rare sight where you come from, but around here they're a dime a dozen.
See also: dime, dozen
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

(a) dime a dozen

Fig. abundant; cheap and common. People who can write good books are not a dime a dozen. Romantic movies are a dime a dozen.
See also: dime, dozen
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dime a dozen

So plentiful as to be valueless. For example, Don't bother to buy one of these-they're a dime a dozen. The dime was declared the American ten-cent coin in 1786 by the Continental Congress. [First half of 1900s]
See also: dime, dozen
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a dime a dozen

AMERICAN
If things or people are a dime a dozen, there are a lot of them, and so they are not especially valuable or interesting. Note: A dime is an American coin worth ten cents. Writers are a dime a dozen, a new one will be easy enough to find. Films about primitive people are a dime a dozen right now. Note: The usual British expression is two a penny.
See also: dime, dozen
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

a dime a dozen

very common and of no particular value. US informal
A dime is a small US coin worth ten cents which occurs in various US expressions as a metaphor for cheapness or smallness.
1998 New Scientist Of course, medical breakthroughs are not a dime a dozen.
See also: dime, dozen
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

a dime a dozen

Overly abundant; commonplace.
See also: dime, dozen
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dime a dozen, a

Readily available, so cheap as to be without value. The dime being an American coin, declared the ten-cent piece by the Continental Congress in 1786 (the word comes from the French dime, for “tithe,” or one-tenth), this expression is obviously American in origin and probably owes its long life to alliterative appeal. Inflation has further degraded the meaning. Early in the twentieth century a dime could buy a paperback book (dime novel) or a cup of coffee and a doughnut; “Brother, can you spare a dime?” was the universal cry for a handout during the Great Depression of the 1930s.
See also: dime
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also: