a cash cow

cash cow

A business or investment that generates a large or consistent profit. When Bob purchased stock in that software company 10 years ago, he never expected it to become such a cash cow. Now that it has quadrupled in value, he'll be able to retire early.
See also: cash, cow

a cash cow

If you call someone or something a cash cow, you mean that it makes a lot of money. This rather unglamorous property is a cash cow, generating about $700 million a year in advertising revenue. A player like Rooney is a potential cash cow to dozens. Note: The reference is to something that produces money as freely as a cow produces milk.
See also: cash, cow
References in periodicals archive ?
EU seems to regard UK as a cash cow IS THE European Union about a family or about banking, because the more I see, the more it seems to me like the only driving force in the EU is money.
THE UK Government were last night accused of treating North Sea oil as "a cash cow" and snubbing the sector in difficult times.
Last night, SNP Energy spokesman Callum McCaig MP said: "The Tories have been using the North Sea - and the north-east of Scotland's economy - as a cash cow for decades and we are getting precious little in return.
And that's supremely important because, as we've already proven, machining is not going to be a cash cow. The metalcasting facility must play that role.
IT USED TO BE THAT THE JUSTIfication for major college football's corrupting effect on academia was that football was a cash cow that helped subsidize education.
Conversely, an SBU with significant market share in an industry with flat or declining sales is termed a cash cow. A corporate parent can use a cash cow to generate some of the cash needed for star SBUs.