buy out

(redirected from a buyout)

buy out

1. verb To buy someone's shares or other financial interests in a company or joint venture, thus releasing them from it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "buy" and "out." Because I bought out my sister, I now get all of the profit from the store.
2. verb To pay someone an agreed-upon amount in exchange for their premature release from a contract. A noun or pronoun can be used between "buy" and "out." When no other teams were interested in trading for that player, we decided to buy him out.
3. verb To purchase something as its sole owner. A noun or pronoun can be used between "buy" and "out." I've always loved that little music club, so I bought it out when the owner was ready to pursue other ventures. If they buy out our little company, will they jettison our staff?
4. verb To purchase all of a particular item or thing that is available. A noun or pronoun can be used between "buy" and "out." That toy is so popular that it's been bought out all over town! We need as many balloons for the party as we can get, so just buy them out at the store.
5. noun The act of paying one an agreed-upon amount in exchange for one's premature release from a contract. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word ("buyout"). When no other teams were interested in trading for that player, we decided to offer him a buyout.
See also: buy, out

buy someone or something out

to purchase full ownership of something from someone or a group. We liked the company, so we borrowed a lot of money and bought it out. Carl bought out the owners of the company.
See also: buy, out

buy something out

to buy all that is available of a particular item. The kids came in and bought all our bubble gum out. They bought out the bubble gum in a single hour.
See also: buy, out

buy out

Purchase the entire stock, business rights, or interests of a concern. For example, A rival store owner offered to buy out my grandfather, but he refused, [Late 1200s]
See also: buy, out

buy out

v.
1. To purchase someone's share of stock, business rights, or interests: I bought my partner out, and now I am the sole owner of the company.
2. To purchase something entirely or completely: The investor bought out the company. The larger company intends to buy the smaller one out.
See also: buy, out
References in periodicals archive ?
James Wade, the district's acquisitions manager, said a checkerboard pattern can emerge when some homeowners decide to do repairs and stay in their homes, while others participate in a buyout program.
Howard, like thousands of other homeowners in similar circumstances, is likely ineligible for a buyout.
This is similar to the "Buy-in to a Buyout" but doesn't include any upfront acquisitions.
This book/CD-ROM resource for entrepreneurs shows how to create a buyout agreement to control who can buy into the business and when a buyout should be required.
Family controlled firms increasingly view a buyout as a succession option, helping ensure the firm's continued independence and enabling families to readjust wealth portfolios.
The second research question we address in this study, therefore, is how do differences in PE firm experience and intensity of post-buyout involvement impact the performance of firms undergoing a buyout?
Also on Monday, McClatchy's flagship Sacramento (Calif.) Bee offered a buyout program to 55% of its full-time employees.
Politicians and unions weighed in after Qantas and Australia's Macquarie Bank confirmed on Wednesday they were discussing a buyout proposal, which also involves US private equity investor Texas Pacific Group and Pacific Equity Partners.
Although not well-known by most developers or tenants, this section has significant implications on both parties, and has shifted the advantage from the rent-stabilized tenant to the developer in a buyout scenario.
In 2002 American Electric Power engineered a buyout of virtually the entire town of Cheshire, Ohio, paying the 200 or so residents $20 million for their homes and their promise to not sue for exposure to past pollution from the company's nearby coal-fired power plant.
They all point, say the analysts, to the prospect of a buyout spree.
Rickertsen focuses on three issues that are central to successful deals -- what skills the executive needs to get involved in a buyout; what preparations need to be made once a buyout opportunity has been identified; and how to manage the exit, or "buy the yacht," as he refers to it.
Another option, although not a buyout, is that employees who are at least 50 years old with 20 years of service, or any age with at least 25 years of service, are eligible for early retirement.
The Midlands continues to be a major player in the private equity field, with the average size of a buyout in 2003 at pounds 116 million.