brain drain

(redirected from a brain drain)

brain drain

The loss of educated and skilled workers to other locations, often ones that provide better financial compensation or job opportunities. The state has some of the nation's best universities, but it suffers from brain drain as graduates often flee to find more lucrative job opportunities elsewhere.
See also: brain, drain

brain-drain

The loss of valuable thinkers and workers to a different organization or geographic area, typically due to the promise of something better, such as pay or opportunities. The stagnation in pay at the university has led to a serious brain-drain.

brain drain

The departure of educated or talented persons for better pay or jobs elsewhere, as in The repression of free speech in Germany triggered a brain drain to Britain and America. The term originated about 1960, when many British scientists and intellectuals emigrated to the United States for a better working climate.
See also: brain, drain

the ˈbrain drain

the loss of qualified scientists, doctors, engineers, etc. to another country, especially one where they are paid more for their work
See also: brain, drain
References in periodicals archive ?
The American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) is promoting the Talent Circulation Alliance (TCA) initiative to encourage exchanges of skilled workers between Taiwan and other like-minded countries to tackle the issue of a brain drain, CNA reports.
said the Philippines has a PNMI score of a contraction of 9 percent, with a brain drain of 16 percent and youth population loss of 13 percent.
Thus, a brain drain is likely to have both a positive and negative impact on the quality of institutions, an issue examined in this paper.
Over the past decade, there has been increasing evidence describing the relationship between the brain drain and poverty, the causal impact of brain drain migration on economic development, the main channels through which a brain drain affects the sending economies, and the impact of the brain drain on human capital formation.
11 A.Mountford, "Can a brain drain be good for growth in the source economy?", Journal of Development Economics, 53, (1997) 287-303.
Iran was one of seven countries with a brain drain between 21 percent and 26 percent.
"There's always the risk of a brain drain or talent drain after the home Olympics.
BRITAIN is being hit by a brain drain with one in 10 highly-skilled workers leaving, a report said yesterday.
Around 1 million skilled persons from officially-designated Least Developed Countries (LDCs) lived and worked in developed countries in 2004, a brain drain of 15%, considering the 6.6 million LDC citizens with university-level educations.
Organizers hope this year's theme, "Roadmap for the Knowledge Driven Economy," will help professionals to collectively chart a course of action to replenish city blocks drained by factors such as the demise of the manufacturing industry, outsourcing and a brain drain of intellectuals fleeing economically challenged areas.
It's interesting to note that Canada is not the only country with a brain drain controversy.
Actually, the argument that high taxes create a brain drain rests on two false premises.
"We have a brain drain of policing talent as experienced officers are leaving in their droves, such are the demands placed on them."
Shorts deny they are facing a brain drain and say their salaries are "competitive."