a blind spot

blind spot

1. An area that is not able to be seen, either due to its location outside of the field of vision, or due to some physical obstruction or a defect in one's vision. Often used to describe the areas around a car that cannot be seen with the rear-view or side mirrors. This car has a big blind spot on the right side, so remember to always turn your head to look before merging. Leslie always experiences blind spots when she starts to get a migraine. That security camera has a blind spot—and that's where we'll sneak in.
2. By extension, an aspect of one's life or a certain situation that one is ignorant of or that one does not understand fully. Jen has a real blind spot when it comes to her relationships with men trying to take advantage of her wealth.
See also: blind, spot

blind spot

Subject about which one is ignorant or biased. For example, The boss has a blind spot about Henry; he wouldn't fire him for anything, or Dad has a blind spot about opera; he can't see anything good about it. This term uses blind in the sense of "covered or hidden from sight." It has two literal meanings: an insensitive part of the retina and an area outside one's field of vision. The phrase has largely replaced blind side, which survives mainly in the verb to blindside, meaning "to hit someone on an unguarded side" and "to deal an unexpected blow." [Mid-1800s]
See also: blind, spot

a blind spot

COMMON A blind spot is an area of knowledge or understanding that you do not have or pay no attention to. The government have a blind spot when it comes to the environment. Patrick's never been great with money — it's a bit of a blind spot with him.
See also: blind, spot

a blind spot

1 an area into which you cannot see. 2 an aspect of something that someone knows or cares little about.
These general senses appear to have developed from a mid 19th-century cricketing term for the spot of ground in front of a batsman where a ball pitched by the bowler leaves the batsman undecided whether to play forward to it or back.
See also: blind, spot

a/somebody’s ˈblind spot

a small part of a subject that somebody does not understand or know anything about: I’m a real music lover but I have to say that modern jazz is a bit of a blind spot with me.
See also: blind, spot
References in periodicals archive ?
The vehicle is to be equipped with a Blind Spot Warning System on the 2.5-litre V6 version.
The company's Blind Spot Information System detects when a vehicle enters a blind spot zone on either side of the car.
The court heard that Moulds had no way of seeing the car in which 74-year-old Pamela Wood was a passenger because of a blind spot on the lorry which cannot be improved.
"It's an unfortunate fact that lorries of this kind, through no-one's fault, simply have a blind spot about which, I am told, nothing can be done.
Knowing that there is such a blind spot places an additional burden on drivers of lorry of this sort.
Many large British companies are suffering from a blind spot over the risk posed by IT failure, according to a new report published today.
It concludes that in the UK, firms are overly concerned with IT costs, but have developed a blind spot over the risk of IT failure.
earlier said the sensor system between the revolving door and the door frame has a blind spot measuring some 65 cm vertically.
Consider a phenomenon long noted by scientists: Each eye possesses a blind spot in the retina corresponding to the head of the optic nerve, yet no black spots mar our view of the world.
In busy traffic, it's easy to lose sight of vehicles when they move into a blind spot, and Ford's system helps drivers to avoid a collision or a near miss.
It concludes that in the UK, companies are overly concerned with IT costs, but have developed a blind spot over the risk of IT failure.
Denis McCauley, director of global technology at the EIU, said: "There is a blind spot in business today regarding the risk that IT failure creates in the business.