a bit dodgy

a bit dodgy

Appearing to be somewhat unsafe or dangerous; dubious; risky. This car looks a bit dodgy to drive in traffic. I don't think we should stay, the crowd in this bar seems a bit dodgy. The way the politicians run the country seems a bit dodgy to me.
See also: bit, dodgy
References in periodicals archive ?
Essentially, and without putting words in their mouth, B of A's message is : "listen, you've all done nicely but things are beginning to look a bit dodgy....
In addition, some of the brains behind the programme think Jack's reputation is a bit dodgy for their clean-cut image.
All right, if you want to get all technical about it, it might have been a bit dodgy under the laws of the game, but come on, football is a game and there are dodgy decisions and dodgy goals scored every week and at least that one brought a smile, unless you were a Liverpool fan of course.
It was a bit dodgy how he left but I think that's the way it is for Wales.
He explained: "The crew come down at regular intervals, and I also carry a camera around for filming when I'm out and about." He added: "I know some of these programmes have turned out a bit dodgy in the past, but that is not a worry for me because I have got nothing dodgy to put in it!"
While the nets were a bit dodgy the pitch is expected to be much flatter, which would be in stark contrast to the 1998 wicket that had Alec Stewart, Mark Butcher and Graham Thorpe hopping about before it was cancelled.