Caddy

(redirected from a Caddy)

Caddy

A nickname for a Cadillac car. My Caddy is in the shop, so can I get a ride with you?

caddy

(ˈkædi)
n. a Cadillac automobile. What I really want is a caddy. Keep your yuppie beemer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lifelong golfer John Boyne, 59, gave up a job with an engineering firm, and took a pay cut, to relocate from Glasgow to become a caddy in St Andrews.
"I had one person refuse to have me as a caddy. But it was his loss.
Rory McIlroy, Graeme McDowell and Martin Kaymer, to name but a few - and you'll see a caddy standing next to him who is not only a long-trusted guide on course, but a close friend off it.
Sam finds the simple rules of being a caddy not so simple.
The submission of a CADDY dossier enables considerable savings in resources paper, copying materials, shipping and storage costs.
It's important to have a caddy who takes care of stuff so that you can concentrate on your game.
In these pages we learn why, despite the fact a caddy's life consists of long hours, menial tasks, and too many weeks when there are no bags to carry, it still exerts a tug on American boys looking to light out for the territory.
Vassion, 40, is a caddy - and he couldn't be happier.
Here's a rule you'd better know, if you have a caddy.
Like the modern game of golf, the term "caddy" originated in Scotland, and had been adopted from the French "cadet." In Scottish usage of the 18th century a caddy was a boy who alternatively acted as a porter, commissionaire, ran errands, and acted as general porter and dog's body.
"As a caddy I had my own interests to look after but I knew it was important the set-up was improved for ALL, from the facilities provided to the clothes caddies wore.
There is also a fruitwood caddie made in the 19th century which is expected to sell for pounds 3,000-pounds 4,000 and from the same period a caddy modelled as an apple should sell at pounds 2,500-33,500.
A caddy's role basically involves putting the right club in the player's hand and saying the right thing at the right time.
Rick, a caddy for more than 20 years and author of best seller A Wee Nip at the 19th Hole, said: "I became caddy manager in 1991 but there was no system for youngsters to progress.