a/the parting of the ways

parting of the ways

A point at which people separate, depart from, or stop associate with one another. The disagreement has led to a parting of the ways between the two global superpowers. I told her I wasn't willing to have children, so we came to a parting of the ways.
See also: of, parting, way

parting of the ways

a point at which people separate and go their own ways. (Often with come to a, arrive at a, reach a, etc.) Jane and Bob finally came to a parting of the ways. Bill and his parents reached a parting of the ways.
See also: of, parting, way

parting of the ways

A point of divergence, especially an important one, as in When Jim decided to travel with the band and Jill wanted a more normal home life, they came to a parting of the ways . This term, which transfers a fork in a road to alternative courses of action, appears in the Bible (Ezekiel 21:21), where the king of Babylon must decide whether or not to attack Jerusalem: "[He] stood at the parting of the way." [c. 1600]
See also: of, parting, way

a (or the) parting of the ways

a point at which two people must separate or at which a decision must be taken.
This phrase has its origins in Ezekiel 21:21: ‘the king of Babylon stood at the parting of the way, at the head of the two ways’.
See also: of, parting, way

a/the ˌparting of the ˈways


1 the place where two or more people who have been travelling together separate and take different routes: We travelled to India together, and in Delhi it was the parting of the ways. Ray went on to China and I went on to Australia.
2 the time when two or more people who have been working, living, etc. together separate and begin a new period in their lives: After college it was the parting of the ways. We all went to live in different parts of the country and gradually we lost touch.
See also: of, parting, way

parting of the ways

A point of divergence, especially one of great moment.
See also: of, parting, way