a/(one's) place in the sun

a/(one's) place in the sun

An advantageous or favorable position or situation. Your place in the sun will be assured when you win this match. After being a secondary player on the world stage, the emerging power began to look for its place in the sun.
See also: place, sun

place in the sun

A dominant or favorable position or situation, as in The Nobel prizewinners really enjoyed their place in the sun. This term may have been coined about 1660 by the French philosopher Blaise Pascal but became well known only in the late 1800s, when it was applied to Germany's position in world affairs, especially concerning its desire for more lands.
See also: place, sun

a place in the sun

If someone has a place in the sun, they are in a job or situation where they are happy and have everything that they want. I think I've earned my place in the sun. They were looking forward to a period of stability and the chance of a place in the sun. Note: This phrase was used by Bernard von Bulow, the German Chancellor, in a speech to the German parliament in 1897, referring to his country's desire to play a part in the colonization of East Asia: `We do not wish to force anyone into the shade, but demand our own place in the sun'.
See also: place, sun

place in the sun

a position of favour or advantage.
In 1897 the German Chancellor, Prince Bernhard Von Bülow , made a speech in the Reichstag in which he declared: ‘we desire to throw no one into the shade [in East Asia], but we also demand our place in the sun’. As a result, the expression has become associated with German nationalism; it is in fact recorded much earlier and is traceable to the writings of the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal ( 1623–62 ).
2002 India Weekly I think it is a great feeling, to know that after years of derision from the world, the Hindi film industry is achieving its place in the sun.
See also: place, sun

a place in the ˈsun

(of a person) a very favourable position, especially in your professional life: When he was offered a professorship at Caltech, he felt that he had finally found his place in the sun.This is a translation of a phrase used in Pascal’s Pensées in the seventeenth century.
See also: place, sun

place in the sun

A dominant or favorable position or situation.
See also: place, sun

place in the sun

A highly favored position. The term appears to have been originated by the French philosopher Blaise Pascal, who wrote (ca. 1660), “There’s my place in the sun: behold the image and beginning of the entire earth’s usurpation.” It did not, however, become widely known until it was used around the turn of the twentieth century concerning Germany’s position in the world, at first by Bernhard von Bülow (1897) and later, several times, by Emperor William II, as a justification for his country’s territorial ambitions. Subsequently, the term came to be used in somewhat more benign fashion to mean simply the glow of public recognition and achievement. As the title of the 1951 film A Place in the Sun, about the idle rich and dubious morals, the term was used ironically.
See also: place, sun