you bet your life


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you (can) bet your (sweet) life

You can be absolutely certain that something will happen. Sometimes used ironically. You bet your sweet life I'm going to that concert—I've been saving up for my ticket for months now! Oh, you can bet your life that Kevin will be late tonight—he's never on time! I lost my umbrella, so you can bet your life that it's going to rain soon.
See also: bet, life

you bet your life

mainly AMERICAN, INFORMAL
People say you bet your life to say `yes' in a very strong way. Would he have been as fast in a Lotus Cortina? You bet your life.
See also: bet, life
References in classic literature ?
"You bet your life it was!" says Tom, just full of admiration.
"You bet your life that they are, you bet your life.
The lesson here was "Make sure your gear works before you bet your life on it."
George Fenneman, who served as Groucho Marx's sidekick on the popular TV show, "You Bet Your Life," poses under the Bartender, a rugged double-ended boat so tough it was adopted by the Coast Guard.
In 1954 he signed with CBS as a actor and singer, appearing on "The Jack Benny Show," "The Red Skelton Show," and "You Bet Your Life." He also toured as lead vocalist with Tommy Dorsey and Frankie Carle.
You bet your life that when an animal touches an electric fence they won't do it again.
Instead, he might use a sign reading "Foreign Policy Decision," which would drop down like Groucho Marx's duck on You Bet Your Life, cutting off further discussion.
"You Bet Your Life" debuted on radio in 1947 and aired on television from 1950 to 1961.
Dwan said 525 "You Bet Your Life" programs were produced in 14 years for radio and television, in which Groucho faced 2,500 contestants.
You are engaging your mirror image so ask yourself another simple question: "Would you bet your life on a flip of a coin?" What are the possibilities here?
"You bet your life I think I can," says Keane, "but maybe not just yet.
Radio and television announcer George Fenneman, perhaps best remembered for his 12-year association with Groucho Marx on the popular radio and TV gameshow "You Bet Your Life," died May 29 of respiratory failure at his home in Los Angeles.
Following the war, Fenneman relocated to Los Angeles, where he auditioned for a new radio quiz show starring Groucho Marx called "You Bet Your Life."
Encouraged by her first husband Sherwood she was a contestant on Groucho Marx's show You Bet Your Life, then made more TV appearances.
YOU bet your life her parents will think you've behaved despicably.