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in a New York minute

Right away; immediately; very quickly. A reference to the notion that things happen at a more rapid pace in New York City. I'd quit my job in a New York minute if I ever won the lottery.
See also: minute, new, York

a New York minute

A very short amount of time. Typically used to indicate that something will happen immediately or very quickly. A reference to the notion that things happen at a more rapid pace in New York City. I'd quit my job in a New York minute if I ever won the lottery.
See also: minute, new, York

york

1. verb To vomit. When I had the flu, I spent most of the time yorking and couldn't eat for days.
2. noun Vomit. After I came home to a pile of york on the floor for the third day in a row, I decided to take the dog to the vet.

a New York minute

a very short time; a moment. US informal
See also: minute, new, York

a New York ˈminute

(American English) a very short period of time; very quickly: Everything can change in a New York minute.I loved the hotel and would stay there again in a New York minute!
This may refer to the idea that everything and everybody moves quickly in New York.
See also: minute, new, York

in a New York minute

and INYM
phr. & comp. abb. almost instantly. I’d do it INYM.
See also: minute, new, York

New York’s finest

n. a New York City police officer. Three of New York’s finest were standing there at my door with my lost dog.
See also: fin, new

york

(jork)
1. in. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. He ate the stuff, then went straight out and yorked.
2. n. vomit. Hey, Jimmy! Come out in the snow and see the frozen york!
References in classic literature ?
New York was altogether at its best that evening, its splendid best.
In half an hour New York had passed from serene sunset and gaping admiration to a troubled and threatening twilight.
New York as a whole could do nothing, could understand nothing.
The units of that vast and varied population bought and learnt what had happened; there had been a fight and New York had hoisted the white flag.
The lamentable incidents that followed the surrender of New York seem now in the retrospect to be but the necessary and inevitable consequence of the clash of modern appliances and social conditions produced by the scientific century on the one hand, and the tradition of a crude, romantic patriotism on the other.
Hence it appears that, except as to the concurrent authority of the President in the article of treaties, it would be difficult to determine whether that magistrate would, in the aggregate, possess more or less power than the Governor of New York.
New York took stray noblemen calmly, and even (except in the Struthers set) with a certain distrustful hauteur; but when they presented such credentials as these they were received with an old-fashioned cordiality that they would have been greatly mistaken in ascribing solely to their standing in Debrett.
It was not the custom in New York drawing-rooms for a lady to get up and walk away from one gentleman in order to seek the company of another.
May is a darling; I've seen no young girl in New York so handsome and so intelligent.