YA


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(Do) you feel (me)?

slang Do you understand or agree with what I'm saying? A: "She just wasn't my type, you feel?" B: "Oh yeah, you were right to break up with her then." I would just rather spend the time relaxing at home than dealing with all the hassle of travel. You feel me? We'll have more luck if we focus on this project first—do you feel me? It will just streamline the whole process down the line.
See also: feel

(I'll) be seeing ya

Goodbye; see you soon. ("Ya" is an informal spelling of "you.") Have a safe trip. I'll be seeing ya. A: "Thanks for such a fun night! See ya later!" B: "Be seeing ya!"
See also: seeing, YA

(I'll) smell ya later

Goodbye for now; I'll see you again soon. A humorous, teasing variant of "(I'll) see you later," used either endearingly or maliciously. "Ya" is an informal spelling of "you." A: "Bye, bro." B: "Smell ya later, sis. Love ya!" I'll smell ya later, nerd. Make sure you've got more lunch money for me tomorrow!
See also: later, smell, YA

a little dab'll do ya

A small amount of something, especially a paste, cream, ointment, etc., will be enough to serve your purpose. Originally part of an advertising slogan in the 1950s for Brylcreem, a hair styling product for men. Primarily heard in US. This is a very powerful anti-inflammatory cream, so don't use too much—a little dab'll do ya. Now, a little dab'll do ya with this chili paste, as you don't want to overpower the other flavors in the curry.
See also: little, YA

check you

See you later; goodbye. A shortening of "check you later." It was nice talking to you—I'll check you.
See also: check

check you later

See you later; goodbye. It was nice talking to you—check you later.
See also: check, later

cold enough for you

A humorous question one asks another when it is obviously quite cold. How are you enjoying this winter? Cold enough for you?
See also: cold, enough, for

How are you feeling?

How are you? The question typically has an emphasis on the listener's health. Miranda, I heard you were sick recently. How are you feeling these days?
See also: how

How ya doin'?

informal How are things? How's life? (A colloquial shortening of "How are you doing?") Hey, great to see you again! How ya doin'?
See also: how, YA

How ya living?

slang How are things? How's life? ("Ya" is a colloquial shortening of "you.") Haven't seen you in a while, man—how ya living?
See also: how, YA

I tell you

1. A phrase emphasizing that the speaker is about to present their opinion on something. I tell you, this burger might be the best I've ever had.
2. I assure you; please listen to what I am saying because it is important. You've got the wrong man, I tell you!
See also: tell

I'll see ya (later)

Goodbye (for now); I'll see you again soon. "Ya" is an informal spelling of "you." OK, I've got to go—I'll see ya later! I'll see ya, man. I had a really great time.
See also: see, YA

I'll tell you

1. Literally, I will simply state (something). You don't need to guess. I'll tell you. My middle name is Marvin.
2. A phrase emphasizing that the speaker is about to present their opinion on something. I'll tell you, this burger might be the best I've ever had.
See also: tell

just a dab'll do ya

A small amount of something, especially a paste, cream, ointment, etc., will be enough to serve your purpose. Based on an advertising slogan ("A little dab'll do ya!") in the 1950s for Brylcreem, a men's hair-styling cream. Primarily heard in US. This is a very powerful anti-inflammatory cream, so don't use too much—just a dab'll do ya. Now, just a dab'll do ya with this chili paste, as you don't want to overpower the other flavors in the curry.
See also: just, YA

let me tell you

Used to emphasize a statement. There's going to be trouble in the city if our team loses this championship, let me tell you. Let me tell you, I've never seen a rat this big in my whole life!
See also: let, tell

love you

A casual farewell phrase uttered to a loved one, especially at the end of a phone call or written message. Sometimes stylized colloquially as "love ya." OK, Mom, I'd better get going. Love you! I'll see you tomorrow, Janet—love ya!
See also: love

see ya (later)

Goodbye (for now); see you again soon. "Ya" is an informal spelling of "you." OK, I've got to go—see ya later! See ya, man. I had a really great time.
See also: see, YA

see you later, alligator

A childish way of saying goodbye, for now. Often responded to with "in a while, crocodile." A: "OK, I've got to go, kiddo—see you later, alligator!" B: "In a while, crocodile! Come home soon!"
See also: alligator, see

tell you what

A phrase indicating that the speaker is going to present a suggestion or their opinion on something. I tell you what, this burger might be the best I've ever had. Tell you what, why don't you go out for a run and I'll watch the kids for a while. I'll tell you what, that was some concert.
See also: tell, what

yasss queen

slang An expression of excitement and approval. The number of A's and S's can vary. Yasss queen! You look gorgeous!
See also: queen, yasss

you know

1. A filler phrase used when one is thinking of what to say next. I like the one with the, you know, the red thing on top.
2. A question posed at the end of a statement to elicit agreement or acknowledgment. I can't describe it. It just felt a little bittersweet, you know?
3. A phrase used to emphasize or draw attention to one's statement. I have skills. I'm not just some office drone, you know.
4. You know the answer; you know what or whom I'm referring to. A: "Which one's your cousin again?" B: "You know, she's the one you met at the concert." A: "What's that?" B: "You know, it's the coin we found in the river when we were kids."
See also: know
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

See ya, bye-bye.

Inf. Bye. Bill: I have to be off. Bob: See ya, bye-bye. Mary: See ya, bye-bye. Sue: Toodle-oo.
See also: see

See you.

 and See ya.
Inf. Good-bye. (See also I'll see you later.) Good game, Tom. See ya. See you, old chum. Give me a ring.
See also: see

See you later, alligator,

 and Later, alligator.
Inf. Good-bye. (Sometimes the reply is After while(, crocodile.)) Bob: See you later, alligator. Jane: After while, crocodile. Bob: Bye, Tom. Tom: See you later, alligator. Bob: Later.
See also: alligator, see

you know

an expression placed on the end of a statement for pause or emphasis. (This expression is often overused, in which case it is totally meaningless and irritating.) Tom: Sure, I spent a fortune on this car. Can't take it with you, you know. Rachel: But there are better things to do with it here and now. Bill: Do you always lock your door? Tom: Usually. There's a lot of theft around here, you know.
See also: know
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

you know

You are aware, you see, do you remember, as in She's very lonely, you know, so do go and visit, or You know, this exhibit ends tomorrow, or You know that black dog our neighbors had? She was run over a year ago. This phrase is also quite often a conversational filler, equivalent to "um" and occasionally repeated over and over (as in It's a fine day for, you know, the beach, and, you know, we could leave now); this usage is more oral than written, and many consider it deplorable. [Late 1500s]
See also: know
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

check you

SOUTH AFRICAN, INFORMAL
Check you or Check you later is an informal way of saying goodbye. OK, check you later.
See also: check

a little dab'll do ya

or

a little dab will do you

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
People say a little dab'll do ya or a little dab will do you to mean that a small amount of something is enough. The thing to remember about cooking with shrimp paste is that a little dab will do ya. Note: This expression was originally an advertising slogan for hair cream in the 1960s.
See also: little, YA
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

check you

goodbye. South African informal
See also: check
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

you ˈknow

(informal)
1 used when you are thinking of what to say next: He’s, you know, strange. It’s hard to explain.
2 used to show that what you are referring to is known or understood by the person you are speaking to: You know I bought a new bag? Well, someone stole it last night.
3 used to emphasize something that you are saying: I’m not stupid, you know.
See also: know

ˈsee you (aˈround)

,

ˌsee you ˈlater

(also (I’ll) be ˈseeing you) (spoken) used to say goodbye to somebody who you expect to see again soon
See also: see

I ˈtell you

,

I can ˈtell you

,

I’m ˈtelling you

,

I can’t ˈtell you how, etc. ...

(spoken) used to emphasize what you are saying, especially when it is surprising or difficult to believe: It’s not as easy as it looks, I’m telling you.I can’t tell you how happy I felt (= it is difficult to describe my happiness, because it was so great).
See also: tell
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

How ya living?

interrog. How are you doing? (The response is Living large.) How ya living, man?
See also: how, YA

See you

and See ya
interj. Good-bye. See you, old chum. Give me a ring.
See also: see

See ya

verb
See also: see, YA

See you later, alligator

interj. Good-bye. (From the 1930s. Answered with After while, crocodile.) TOM: Bye. BILL: See you later, alligator. BILL: See you later, alligator. TOM: After while, crocodile.
See also: alligator, see

ya

pro. you. (Eye-dialect. Typical spoken English. Used in writing only for effect. Used in the examples of this dictionary.) See ya!
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

you know

Informal
Used parenthetically in conversation, as to fill pauses or educe the listener's agreement or sympathy: Please try to be, you know, a little quieter. How were we supposed to make camp in a storm like that, you know?
See also: know
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

See you later, alligator

Bye! The title of a 1950s rock-'n'-roll smash hit by Bill Haley and His Comets, the phrase was already in use, especially in the South. For a decade or more, hep/hip/with-it cats and chicks ended conversations with the phrase. The standard reply was the song's next line: “after a while, crocodile.”
See also: alligator, see
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
See also: