wrinkle

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iron out the wrinkles (of/in something)

1. Literally, to remove wrinkles from something, especially a piece of fabric, using a flatiron. Your new dress shirt is all rumpled! You'll need to iron out the wrinkles before you go to the ceremony this evening. I have to iron out the wrinkles in this tablecloth before our guests arrive.
2. By extension, to ease, solve, or remove minor difficulties, troubles, or problematic details (of or in something). (Sometimes worded as "some wrinkles," "a few wrinkles," etc.) Our latest software update is nearly finished—we just need to iron out a few wrinkles before it's ready for release. Your friends and family are great means of support when you need to iron out the wrinkles of your life. Bob and Janet are seeing a counselor to try and iron out the wrinkles in their marriage.
See also: iron, out, wrinkle

iron the wrinkles out (of/in something)

1. Literally, to remove wrinkles from something, especially a piece of fabric, using a flatiron. Your new dress shirt is all rumpled! You'll need to iron the wrinkles out before you go to the ceremony this evening. I have to iron out the wrinkles in this tablecloth before our guests arrive.
2. By extension, to ease, solve, or remove minor difficulties, troubles, or problematic details (of or in something). (Sometimes worded as "some wrinkles," "a few wrinkles," etc.) Our latest software update is nearly finished—we just need to iron a few wrinkles out before it's ready for release. Your friends and family are great means of support when you need to iron the wrinkles out in your life. Bob and Janet are seeing a counselor to try and iron some wrinkles out of their marriage.
See also: iron, out, wrinkle

add a new wrinkle

To bring or contribute a new and often unexpected aspect, dimension, innovation, development, or stratagem (to something). If proven to be true, the discovery could add a new wrinkle to the way we think about the evolutionary process. Their new, and unorthodox, pitcher has added a new wrinkle to the team's offensive game.
See also: add, new, wrinkle

a new wrinkle

A new and often unexpected aspect, dimension, innovation, development, or stratagem. If proven to be true, the discovery could signal a new wrinkle in the way we think about the evolutionary process. Their new, and unorthodox, pitcher has brought a new wrinkle to the team's offensive game.
See also: new, wrinkle

penis wrinkle

vulgar slang A juvenile insult for someone one considers despicable. Said almost exclusively of a male. A: "I heard the CEO got 15 years in prison." B: "Good. That penis wrinkle deserves every single minute of it."
See also: wrinkle

get the wrinkles out (of something)

1. Literally, to remove wrinkles from something, especially a piece of fabric, typically by using an iron or steamer. Your new dress shirt is all rumpled! You'll need to get the wrinkles out before you go to the ceremony this evening. I have to get the wrinkles out of this tablecloth before our guests arrive.
2. By extension, to ease, solve, or remove minor difficulties, troubles, or problematic details (of or in something). (Sometimes worded as "some wrinkles," "a few wrinkles," etc.) Our latest software update is nearly finished—we just need to get a few more wrinkles out before it's ready for release. When you need to get the wrinkles out of your life, turn to your friends and family for help and support. Bob and Janet are seeing a counselor to try and get the wrinkles out of their marriage.
See also: get, out, wrinkle

get the wrinkles out

 (of something)
1. Lit. to remove the wrinkles from fabric by ironing or flattening in some way. This has been packed in my suitcase for a week, and I know I'll never be able to get the wrinkles out of it.
2. Fig. to eliminate some initial, minor problems with an invention, a procedure, a computer program, or a mechanical device. I need more time working with this system to get the wrinkles out.
See also: get, out, wrinkle

wrinkle something up

to make something get wrinkles and creases. I love the way you wrinkle your nose up. Don't wrinkle up your jacket.
See also: up, wrinkle

wrinkle up

[for something] to draw up in wrinkles; [for something] to become wrinkled. His nose wrinkled up as he smelled the burning pie. The cloth wrinkled up in the intense heat.
See also: up, wrinkle

new wrinkle

A clever device or expedient, a novelty, as in The players added a new wrinkle to victory celebrations by tossing their shirts to the crowd after the game . In the form of simply a wrinkle, this expression dates from the mid-1700s, new being added two centuries later.
See also: new, wrinkle

iron out the wrinkles

resolve all minor difficulties and snags.
Iron out has been in figurative use since the mid 19th century; it often occurs with other nouns, especially differences .
1984 New Yorker Willa had sold her story to Universal Pictures and was in California ironing out some wrinkles in the deal.
See also: iron, out, wrinkle

penis wrinkle

n. a despised person, usually a male. (Also a term of address.) Get out of here, penis wrinkle.
See also: wrinkle

wrinkle

1. n. a new idea; a new aspect of something. Here’s a clever wrinkle for you. Nobody has ever tried this one.
2. n. a minor problem. A wrinkle has developed in the Wilson proposal.

wrinkle-rod

n. the crankshaft of an engine. A wrinkle-rod’ll set you back about $199, plus installation charges, of course.

new wrinkle, a

A happy expedient, a novel or different device. The transfer of “wrinkle” from rumpled clothing or age-lined skin took place in the 1800s, but the idea of novelty was added in the United States in the early 1900s. Jazz composer W. C. Handy used it in Father of the Blues (1941): “In addition to twirling their batons, they added the new wrinkle of tossing them back and forth.” This cliché is particularly popular with business journalists.
See also: new
References in periodicals archive ?
The wrinkled laminated membranes with different ply numbers were simulated and the geometrical characteristics of the wrinkled laminated membranes are shown in Table 13.
The wrinkled laminated membranes with these three ply modes were simulated and the geometrical features of the wrinkle are listed in Table 14.
Mikulas, "Application of a wrinkled membrane finite Element approach to advanced membrane structures," in Proceedings of the AIAA Space 2001 Conference and Exposition, vol.
Pellegrino, "Nonlinear vibration of wrinkled membranes," in Proceedings of the 44th AIAA/ASME/ ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference, vol.
Pellegrino, "Wrinkled membranes II: analytical models," Journal of Mechanics of Materials and Structures, vol.
(Otherwise, why isn't our skin wrinkled all the time?) And scientists are curious whether other animals have this reaction to immersing their digits in water.
Cellular events of wrinkled blastula formation and the influence of the fertilization envelope on wrinkling in the seastar Patiriella exigua.
"We also found that women with a wrinkled appearance also had lower protein intakes," they wrote.
And once you stop, your skin will likely return to its original wrinkled appearance, according to dermatologists.
The test model of the ETFE inflatable tube under bending loads is shown in Figure 2, and the wrinkles in wrinkled regions of the inflatable tube are shown in Figure 3.
Based on the engineering elastic beam theory, the internal pressure is assumed to sustain the section configuration, the rotation axis of section of balanced moment is still passing through the center of the section, the stress of thin films is zero in the wrinkled region along the wrinkling direction, and then the relationship between wrinkling angle and load is obtained by force and bending moment equilibrium equations of the section.
As shown in Figure 5, the moment of inertia in the wrinkled region of the beam is as follows [20]:
In the July 19 Science, Walsh and his colleague Anjen Chenn, now at Northwestern University School of Medicine in Chicago, described genetically engineered mice that develop cerebral cortexes with greatly increased surface area, so much so that the mouse brains have a more humanlike, wrinkled appearance.
Round seeds (RR or Rr) contain a much higher ratio of amylopectin to amylose than do wrinkled seeds (rr), suggesting the enzyme doesn't function properly in wrinkled peas.
When the researchers cloned the gene, they found it was always larger in wrinkled seeds than in round seeds.