window

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window dressing

1. literal A decorative display in a window, typically the window of a store. When my mom and I go shopping at Christmastime, we always check out all the pretty holiday window dressings!
2. figurative Something that makes a person or thing look or seem better than it really is. To me, this new policy seems like window dressing to woo new employees. You say that you've changed, but how do I know it's not just window dressing to make you seem like less of a jerk?
See also: dressing, window

window-shopping

The act of visiting stores, or looking in their windows, to see what is available without buying anything. My bank account is so sad these days that I'll only be window-shopping for a while! A: "You guys really went in that expensive boutique?" B: "Yeah, but we were only window-shopping, don't worry! We know we can't afford anything in there!"

make a better door than a window

A humorous phrase said to someone who is blocking the speaker's line of sight. Move it, will you? You make a better door than a window!
See also: better, door, make, window

don't have a pot to piss in (or a window to throw it out of)

rude slang Broke or destitute It sounds like Betsy doesn't have a pot to piss in. So what makes you think she's going to loan you money?
See also: have, out, piss, pot, throw, window

go out the window

To be forgotten, disregarded, or lost. One member of the audience started shouting at the speaker during the presentation, and all sense of decorum went right out the window. Once the government deregulated the industry, expensive safety precautions were the first thing to go out the window.
See also: out, window

out the window

Forgotten or disregarded; lost or wasted. One member of the audience started shouting at the speaker during the presentation, and all sense of decorum went right out the window. Once the government deregulated the industry, expensive safety precautions were the first thing out the window.
See also: out, window

crack the door (open)

 and crack the window (open)
to open the door or window a very small amount. I cracked open the door to peek out. Just crack the window a bit to let some air inside.
See also: crack, door

go window-shopping

to go about looking at goods in store windows without actually buying anything. The office workers go window-shopping on their lunch hour, looking for things to buy when they get paid. Joan said she was just going window-shopping, but she bought a new coat.

out (of) the window

Fig. gone; wasted. All that work gone out the window because my computer crashed. My forty dollars—out the window! Why didn't I save my money?
See also: out, window

When poverty comes in at the door, love flies out of the window.

 and When the wolf comes in at the door, love creeps out of the window.
Prov. If a couple gets married because they are in love, but they do not have enough money, they will stop loving each other when the money runs out. You young folks may think you can live on love alone, but when poverty comes in at the door, love flies out of the window. After Susan lost her job, she and her unemployed husband had a big argument. When the wolf comes in at the door, love creeps out of the window.
See also: come, flies, love, of, out, poverty, window

window of opportunity

Fig. a brief time period in which an opportunity exists. This afternoon, I had a brief window of opportunity when I could discuss this with the boss, but she wasn't receptive.
See also: of, opportunity, window

You make a better door than you do a window.

Rur. I cannot see through you, so move aside. Joe was just standing in front of the TV. "Hey," I said, "You make a better door than you do a window." Charlie: Isn't this a great view? Jane: You make a better door than you do a window. Let me see.
See also: better, door, make, window

out of the window

Discarded, tossed out. This term is often used in the phrase go out the window, as in For the town planners past experience seems to have gone out the window. It alludes to unwanted items being hurled out of the window. [First half of 1900s]
See also: of, out, window

go out the window

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

go out of the window

BRITISH
COMMON If something such as a plan or a way of thinking or behaving goes out the window or goes out of the window, it suddenly disappears completely. Finding myself in a country with so much delicious food, all thoughts of dieting went out the window. When people are so desperate to do something, common sense often goes out of the window. Note: Other verbs such as fly are sometimes used instead of go. Three years later she met Mick, and her good intentions flew out the window.
See also: out, window

go out (of) the window

(of a plan or pattern of behaviour) no longer exist; disappear. informal
1998 Economist In the ensuing struggle between the two groups [of councillors], the public interest goes out of the window.
See also: out, window

window of opportunity

a favourable opportunity for doing something that must be seized immediately if it is not to be missed.
See also: of, opportunity, window

be, go, etc. out/out of the ˈwindow

(informal) (of a chance, an opportunity, a job, etc.) disappear; be lost: All my hopes of finding a good job in television have gone out of the window.Don’t throw this opportunity out of the window.
See also: of, out, window

a ˌwindow of opporˈtunity

a limited period of time when you can do something that you want to do or need to do: The government’s difficulties provided the opposition with a window of opportunity to present an alternative policy to the voters.
See also: of, opportunity, window

a ˌwindow on the ˈworld

a way of learning about other people and other countries: News programmes try to provide a window on the world.
See also: on, window, world

bay window

n. a belly; an abdomen. You are going to have to do something about that bay window.
See also: bay, window

out the window

mod. gone; wasted. My forty dollars—out the window. Why didn’t I save my money?
See also: out, window