President Wilson

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Related to Wilson: Woodrow Wilson

President Wilson

n. an erection. (Punning on Woodrow = woody Wilson.) I am always happy to see President Wilson come round.
See also: president
References in classic literature ?
Alexander sat down in a high-backed chair and began to pour it, while Wilson sank into a low seat opposite her and took his cup with a great sense of ease and harmony and comfort.
It is," Wilson assented, selecting his muffin carefully; "and I hope he won't be tired tonight.
There at least he was cornered between the moors and the breakers; and the scout sent by Wilson reported him as writing under a solitary candle, perhaps composing another of his tremendous proclamations.
It's all the other way," said the man called Wilson, rather quickly.
It came to nothing, sir,' said Wilson, beginning to strop the razor with no appearance of concern.
The first intimation that Wilson had that the schedule was actually to be put into practical operation was when his employer, one Monday evening, requested him to buy a medium-sized bunch of the best red roses and deliver them personally, with a note, to Miss Marguerite Parker at the stage-door of the Duke of Cornwall's Theatre.
Wilson, I think," said he, in a tone of recognition, and extending his hand.
Wilson, he added--"I should like to have a few moments' conversation with you on business, in my room, if you please.
The strips were now returned to the grooved box, and took their place among what Wilson called his "records.
Bless yo' soul, Misto Wilson, it's pow'ful nice o' you to say dat,
At last they went up slowly, in the order, though not at all in the manner, of their flying descent; followed Miss Wilson into the class-room; and stood in a row before her, illumined through three western windows with a glow of ruddy orange light.
You are aware that you have broken the rules," said Miss Wilson quietly.
Wilson was more brilliant than ever, with her budgets of fresh news and old scandal, strung together with trivial questions and remarks, and oft-repeated observations, uttered apparently for the sole purpose of denying a moment's rest to her inexhaustible organs of speech.
Richard Wilson, Jane's younger brother, sat in a corner, apparently good-tempered, but silent and shy, desirous to escape observation, but willing enough to listen and observe: and, although somewhat out of his element, he would have been happy enough in his own quiet way, if my mother could only have let him alone; but in her mistaken kindness, she would keep persecuting him with her attentions - pressing upon him all manner of viands, under the notion that he was too bashful to help himself, and obliging him to shout across the room his monosyllabic replies to the numerous questions and observations by which she vainly attempted to draw him into conversation.
Wilson came two other guests -- one, the Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale, whom the reader may remember as having taken a brief and reluctant part in the scene of Hester Prynne's disgrace; and, in close companionship with him, old Roger Chillingworth, a person of great skill in physic, who for two or three years past had been settled in the town.