wildfire

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like wildfire

Very rapidly and uncontrollably. I didn't expect that rumor to spread like wildfire, but it seems like everyone has heard about it already.
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spread like wildfire

To spread, circulate, or propagate very quickly and widely. Likened to the rapid spread of a literal wildfire. News of the scandal spread like wildfire across the news outlets. An outbreak of the deadly virus has been spreading like wildfire through the closely confined camps of refugees.
See also: like, spread, wildfire

spread like wildfire

Fig. [for something] to spread rapidly. Rumors spread like wildfire when people are excited. This disease will spread like wildfire when it gets going.
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spread like wildfire

Disseminate or circulate very quickly, as in The rumor about their divorce spread like wildfire. The noun wildfire means "a raging, rapidly spreading conflagration." [c. 1800]
See also: like, spread, wildfire

spread like wildfire

COMMON If something, especially information or a disease, spreads like wildfire, it very quickly reaches or affects a lot of people. The news of his release spread like wildfire. These stories were spreading like wildfire through the neighbourhood. The virus swept through the team like wildfire. Note: This expression may refer to the way that fires which start in the countryside spread very quickly and are difficult to control.
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spread like wildfire

spread with great speed.
See also: like, spread, wildfire

spread like ˈwildfire

(especially of news or disease) travel or spread very quickly: Rumours about a fall in the price of oil spread like wildfire in the city.Cholera spread like wildfire through the camps.
See also: like, spread, wildfire

like wildfire

Rapidly and intensely: The disease spread like wildfire.
See also: like, wildfire
References in periodicals archive ?
It may not be getting headlines in the national news, but wildfires have burned millions of acres in the West this year and the communities impacted in Colorado need assistance, Gardner said.
While the study discovered that humans cause a majority of wildfires, nature also plays a role in the ignition.
Nationwide, nearly 9 out of 10 wildfires are human-caused, which means 9 out of 10 wildfires could have been prevented with proper care," said Charlie Morgan, State Forester, Mississippi Forestry Commission.
And while state officials have not said what caused the wildfires, the space agency pointed the finger at lightning.
Science suggests that over the past few decades, the number of wildfires has indeed increased, especially in the western United States.
Research shows that property location plays a significant role in determining exposure to wildfires.
Related: Destructive California wildfires continue to ravage the West Coast [photos] 5 things to know about wineries and wildfire claims
The Department of the Interior records 300 new wildfires each day during summer fire season, rising above 500 new fires on the busiest days.
As towns and cities across the country are experiencing the devastating impacts from wildfire, the Community Planning Assistance for Wildfire (CPAW) program offers support at the local level.
The SMOKEY'S JOURNEY section provides a timeline of Smokey's history teaching people about reducing human-caused wildfires.
where he lived the rest of his days as a reminder that wildfires have the potential to destroy much more than just trees and brush.
There were 15 large wildfires that year, each burning more than 100,000 acres, according to the National Interagency Fire Center.
Kathmandu, May 10 -- Waking up to the fact that deadly forest fires raged in more than 400 places in 43 districts this year, the government has decided to create a basket fund to prevent and control wildfires, an official said.
While the 2007 California wildfires made national headlines, nearly every state experienced a significant wildfire last year.
During March 12-20, 2006, wildfires burned approximately 1 million acres in the Panhandle region of Texas, advancing 45 miles in 9 hours, with dense smoke and flames up to 11 feet.