whirling dervish

(redirected from Whirling Dervishes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Whirling Dervishes: Sufism

whirling dervish

A person displaying a huge, boundless amount of energy. A reference to the dervishes, members of an order of Sufi Muslims in Turkey, some of which are known for their ceremonies in which they perform a whirling dance as a devotional act. I feel uneasy around small, boisterous children, so my cousin's party was really unpleasant, having so many of these whirling dervishes around. The team's captain, a six-foot-tall whirling dervish, has been instrumental in their success over the past year.
See also: whirl

whirling dervish

Boundless energy. Dervishes are members of a mendicant religious order of Sufi Moslems. Part of their worship is a trance-inducing ritual in which the men, who wear billowing white skirts whirl in circles meant to replicate planets revolving around the sun. “Whirling dervish” became a metaphor for nonstop energy, used in such ways as “He dashed through the hardware store, then ran home and cleaned out the garage and then built shelves along one wall, all before lunch—he was a regular whirling dervish.”
See also: whirl
References in periodicals archive ?
The Whirling Dervishes of Damascus are traditional Sufi dancers.
The evening will feature classical Turkish music, poetry, singing and the prayer dancing of the Whirling Dervishes. In their traditional tall felt hats and brilliant white garments, turners whirl in unison, attuning to the music of the heart.
His first ballet The Firebird may be an extravagant costume drama, but it is difficult not to be impressed when the stage is filled with whirling dervishes and Nao Sakuma is hovering in the wings as the destroying Firebird.
The CD is called "Ecstasy and Mysticism" because the Turkish composers assimilated some Western waltz rhythms into their reflective and religious works, as the booklet insert tells us, "even entering into the ritual of the 'whirling dervishes.'" Fair enough.
After it was clear that Molly Smolen was 'the chosen one', she stood paralysed and doll-like in the centre of the whirling dervishes for what seemed an eternity.
A grand and sometimes cheerfully kitsch ceremony combined children's choirs, Beethoven's Ode to Joy (Bosnia is desperate to join the EC), Orff's Carmina Burana, a plangent marching Turkish brass band, brave divers, (1) rhythmic dancers, slightly torpid, whirling dervishes, and the biggest bangs and flashes since the end of the civil war between Croats (Catholics) and Muslims in 1994.
But the main problem with the whirling dervishes has nothing to do with the amount of electricity they produce.
The sellout audience was entertained by whirling Dervishes, futuristic punks, an African story and much more.
These "whirling dervishes," as the West called them, attempted to alter their consciousness through ecstatic gyration, and thus get closer to God.
Allen Iverson and Jackie Stiles (the one without the tattoos) were the whirling dervishes who made everyone ecstatic in 2000-2001.
And so they come, every year between the 10th and 17th December, to marvel at the spectacle of the Whirling Dervishes. As the cloaked dancers (semazen) file in the atmosphere in the hall fills with expectation, conversations subside, and all settle into a relaxed frame of mind as the musicians take up their instruments and the singers take up their positions.
These are the poems of the thinking body, of "what the skin knows" ("What the skin knows"), of "crows falling from a brain sky/full of holes" ("As in a Cage," "Ten Billion Blackbirds"), and they tell us of ourselves like "whirling dervishes," "agitated beehives," buzzing and electric with the physicality of thinking ("Whirling Dervishes I").
Indian artists Ria Sharma and Sonu Sultania have focused on the whirling dervishes. In her cubist paintings from a series titled The Search Within, Sharma has used the meditative movement of the Sufi seekers as a metaphor for the spiritual rhythm of Ramadan, when people remove themselves from worldly comforts to enter a meditative state and connect with their inner selves and with God.
ISLAMABAD -- The mesmerizing ritual dance of the whirling dervishes from Turkey and singing of the patriotic songs by Pakistani singers left the audience spellbound at a show held at the President House.