west

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East is East and West is West (and never the twain shall meet)

proverb Said of two things are too different to ever be agreeable or harmonious. The phrase comes from a Rudyard Kipling poem. If you learn young that East is East and West is West, you won't waste time trying to convert people to your views.
See also: and, east, never, shall, twain, west

East or West, home's best

proverb Home is the best or most ideal place to be, regardless of its physical location. No matter how exhilarating my travels are, I'm always thrilled to come home. East or West, home's best.
See also: east

East, West, home's best

proverb Home is the best or most ideal place to be, regardless of its physical location. No matter how exhilarating my travels are, I'm always thrilled to come home. East, West, home's best.

go west

1. Of a person, to die. When I go west, I don't want any elaborate funeral services in my honor, OK?
2. Of a machine, to stop working. Can you get a new coffee pot while you're at the mall? Ours has finally gone west.
See also: go, west

knock galley-west

slang To put into a state of chaos or unconsciousness. Primarily heard in US. I got knocked galley-west by that last punch—where am I? Any time my mother visits, my life gets knocked galley-west!
See also: knock

out West

In the western part, portion, or region of a country. I'm going to spend Christmas out West with my parents. With the rents in Dublin getting so high, many people are seeking cheaper accommodation out West.
See also: out, west
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

East is East and West is West (and never the twain shall meet).

Prov. Two things are so different that they can never come together or agree. (From Rud-yard Kipling's poem, "The Ballad of East and West.") I had hoped that Andrew and I could be friends in spite of our political differences. But, in our case, I'm afraid that East is East and West is West.
See also: and, east, west

East, west, home's best.

 and East or west, home is best.
Prov. Home is the best place to be no matter where it is. You may think that traveling all the time is fun, but eventually you'll discover that east or west, home is best.

out West

in the western part of the United States. We lived out West for nearly ten years. Do they really ride horses out West?
See also: out, west
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

go west

Die, as in He declared he wasn't ready to go west just yet. This expression has been ascribed to a Native American legend that a dying man goes to meet the setting sun. However, it was first recorded in a poem of the early 1300s: "Women and many a willful man, As wind and water have gone west."
See also: go, west
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

go west

OLD-FASHIONED
1. When someone goes west, they die. When he went west, he wanted to be remembered.
2. When something goes west, it stops existing or working. His hopes of a professional singing career went west long ago. Note: The sun `goes west' when it sinks below the horizon in the west at the end of the day. The comparison between going west and dying has been used in many different languages and cultures for many centuries. For example, people sometimes associate this expression with Native Americans, who used to say that a dying person went west to meet the sinking sun.
See also: go, west
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

go west

be killed or lost; meet with disaster. British informal
The image here is of the sun setting in the west at the end of the day.
See also: go, west
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

go West

in. to die. When I go West, I want flowers, hired mourners, and an enormous performance of Mozart’s “Requiem.”
See also: go, west
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

wild and woolly (West), the

The untamed, wide open western United States. The term dates from the late nineteenth century, popularized by a book title, Adair Welcker’s Tales of the “Wild and WoollyWest” (1891). A publisher’s note on the book said “wild and woolly” referred to the rough sheepskin coats worn by cowboys and farmers, but Franklin P. Adams said “wild, woolly and full of flies” was a cowboy’s expression for a genuine cowboy. Owen Wister’s The Virginian (1902) stated, “I’m wild, and woolly and full of fleas,” which was later picked up in the cowboy ditty, “Pecos Bill and the Wilful Coyote” (ca. 1932) by W. C. White: “Oh, I’m wild and woolly and full of fleas, Ain’t never been curried below the knees.”
See also: and, wild, woolly
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in classic literature ?
The travellers continued their course to the south of west for about forty miles, through a region so elevated that patches of snow lay on the highest summits and on the northern declivities.
They encamped for the night opposite the end of a mountain in the west, which was probably the last chain of the Rocky Mountains.
We all fought shy of 30d on the east and 175d on the west, and, though we had to skirt them pretty close, nothing but an act of God ever drew one of us across.
Well, to get back to my narrative; we kept on dropping slowly toward the surface the while we bucked the west wind, clawing away from thirty as fast as we could.
The wind had dropped to a steady blow, still from west by north, and the sea had gone down correspondingly.
It has been determined at latitude fifty degrees seven minutes north, longitude twenty degrees sixteen minutes west."
Having thus given the reader some idea of the actual state of the fur trade in the interior of our vast continent, and made him acquainted with the wild chivalry of the mountains, we will no longer delay the introduction of Captain Bonneville and his band into this field of their enterprise, but launch them at once upon the perilous plains of the Far West.
To the west, Bokhara, and, even to the south and west, Afghanistan, were swallowed up.
For it was these bacteria, and germs, and microbes, and bacilli, cultured in the laboratories of the West, that had come down upon China in the rain of glass.
Many millions engaged in them, charging to the bounds of the Empire to be met and turned back by the gigantic armies of the West. The slaughter of the mad hosts on the boundaries was stupendous.
Finally, in 1857, Lieutenants Burton and Speke, both officers in the Bengal army, were sent by the London Geographical Society to explore the great African lakes, and on the 17th of June they quitted Zanzibar, and plunged directly into the west.
As they advanced the ground became rougher and hillier, for there were no farms nor houses in this country of the West, and the ground was untilled.
Now the Wicked Witch of the West had but one eye, yet that was as powerful as a telescope, and could see everywhere.
The second time was when she had fought against the Great Oz himself, and driven him out of the land of the West. The Winged Monkeys had also helped her in doing this.
Then, being at last free to do as she chose, she ran out to the courtyard to tell the Lion that the Wicked Witch of the West had come to an end, and that they were no longer prisoners in a strange land.
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