weigh anchor

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weigh anchor

To hoist the anchor so that a ship can sail. Weigh anchor, boys—we're going home!
See also: anchor, weigh

weigh ˈanchor

(of a ship and its passengers) leave a place: We weighed anchor in the afternoon and started for the Philippines.
This means ‘to lift the anchor out of the water’ before sailing away.
See also: anchor, weigh
References in periodicals archive ?
IDF officials explained that the intention was never to harass the soldiers and other than the initial planning - which was logistic rather than operational -- no ship ever weighed anchor and the routine operational and training schedule was not altered.
The ship, with Begin and other Revisionist leaders now on board, weighed anchor and put out to sea, chased by IDF craft.
Named after worldwide famous Ottoman captain, geographer and cartographer Piri Reis, the vessel weighed anchor from the Urla Port in the western province of Izmir on Friday for East Mediterranean to explore oil and natural gas.
Witnesses said the boat sunk just five minutes after it weighed anchor, 100 meters from the shore, possibly due to the bad weather.
The last news concerning the ship and her crew was in mid-February, when the vessel weighed anchor and steamed south, only to change course and return a day later to the Somali coast.
This hot, desert-like region is inhabited by the Wayu, or Guajiro, Indians who lived there long before Europeans first weighed anchor off their coast in 1499.
Nassau weighed anchor on 23 September to return to its homeport in Norfolk, Va.
After boarding at Palma and a day at sea we first weighed anchor at Olbia, in Sardinia, the second largest island in the Mediterranean which is generally mountainous with a few coastal plains.
On the fourth day after our arrival in Britain, the eighteen ships which transported the cavalry weighed anchor.
No efforts are being spared to try to find the plucky Claisse, and late last night racecourse chairman Sam Vestey's private yacht, inexplicably named 'The Fourth Day', took on provisions from Fortnums and weighed anchor to join the search, after reports from a fishing boat in the Bristol Channel that a desperate voice had been heard in the darkness shouting "good to soft, salty in places".
As the liner ship weighed anchor at Queenstown (now Cobh), Ireland, the famous amateur photographer and Jesuit priest Father Brown, was taking some last pictures after crossing on the ship from Southampton.