warchalking


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Related to warchalking: Wardriving, Bluejacking, Bluesnarfing

warchalking

The act or practice of using chalk symbols on or outside of places or establishments in which one is able to access wireless Internet for free and without a password. (Modeled on the similar term "wardriving," which refers to the act of driving around some area in search of free, open wireless internet networks.) A bunch of students began this warchalking movement in and around the city to help alleviate their cost of people's phone bills.

warchalking

n. making a mark in a location where a wireless interconnection is available. Since more and more Wi-Fi hot spots are available, warchaulking has become rare.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has reached the stage where there is even a company that produces warchalking clothing (Ward, 2002)--OK, you wear golf clothes to play golf, and a swimsuit to swim; why not warchalking clothes to warchalk?
It has been argued that warchalking is either unethical or illegal or both.
Warchalking http://www.blackbeltjones.com/ warchalking/index2.html
Warchalking Legality FAQ http://www.warchalking.org/story/ 2002/9/22/223831/236
Warchalking is the act of looking for these wireless networks and placing chalk symbols on walls and pavements to let people know where they can access the network.
However, there are those who actively seek them out and it is these people who have begun the warchalking craze, leaving symbols with details of network connections for other users.'
She added: 'Many argue that warchalking is not theft since theft involves taking something from someone which prevents them from using it.
Warchalking has already been called the Napster of internet access, so don't be surprised if it all ends up in court.
LAP IT UP: A free go at warchalking; THE KEY: An Orinoco card
But Ben Hammersley, a freelance writer who says he made the first chalk mark of the craze outside his house in London five weeks ago, said yesterday: ``The potential use of warchalking for hacking purposes has been highly overblown.
Jeremy Beale, head of ebusiness for the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) said: 'The CBI condemns warchalking as an implicit incitement to irresponsible and illegal acts.
But Ben Hammersley, a freelance writer who says he made the first chalk mark of the craze outside his house in London five weeks ago, retorted: 'The potential use of warchalking for hacking purposes has been highly overblown.
Warchalking was devised as a concept on June 24 by some friends of Mr Hammersley.
If you see peculiar chalk markings on buildings - and next to them groups of people huddled around laptops - then chances are they are warchalking.
But why "warchalking?" It's a pun on warwalking, which comes from wardialing, which (and here's where it starts to make sense) is connected to a long tradition of sniffing around for secret systems of the world.