upspeak


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upspeak

A manner of speaking in which each sentence has a rising intonation, like a question. I'm trying to curb my upspeak so that the boss sees me as a confident businessperson, which I am.
References in periodicals archive ?
Who benefits from the status quo when we pretend dress does not matter, or demeanor does not matter, or the presence of family members does not matter, or language ability or upspeak or race or gender does not matter?
(151) Yasuhiro Ozuru & William Hirst, Surface Features of Utterances, Credibility Judgments, and Memory, 34 MEMORY & COGNITION 1512, 1513 (2006); John Baldoni, Will 'Upspeak' Hurt Your Career?, FORBES (July 30, 2015), https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnbaldoni/2015/07/30/will-upspeak-hurt-your-career/#3f96f3ab4edc; Ken Broda-Bahm, Avoid Rising Intonation?, PERSUASIVE LITIGATOR (May 26, 2014), https://www.persuasivelitigator.com/2014/05/avoid-rising-intonation.html (summarizing studies finding that rising intonation or upspeak negatively impact perceptions of credibility).
For example, speech coach Susan Sankin says using upspeak (also known as "uptalk") can make you seem indecisive and less confident at work.
American and Aussie TV shows consumed in the UK are being blamed for spreading upspeak among professional Brits.
My observation has been that women use upspeak much more often than do men.
If HRT serves to frame statements in the form of a question, then the game show upspeak 48 percent of the time, and that didn't vary significantly when they were incorrect.
This contrasts with upspeak, which implies a question through a raised tone at the end of sentences, connoting uncertainty and tentativeness (Bradford, 1997).
Transcriptions included notation indicating highly emotional content, whispering, laughter, emphasis, pauses, and "upspeak."
"Upspeak"--the habit of ending a sentence or phrase with a higher pitch, as if it were a question--is a familiar characteristic of contemporary feminine speech.
If you say a statement with the intonation of a question, that's called "upspeak." It happens when you end your sentences with a higher pitch than they began with and makes you sound as if you're unsure of what you're saying.
This is the interrogative sentence, its last word or syllable with rising intonation or inflexion, sometimes called the upspeak or Australian.