Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown

uneasy lies the head that wears a/the crown

The person who has the most power or authority suffers the largest amount of stress, anxiety, doubt, and worry. Originally from Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part II. Sometimes I wish I weren't the boss of this company so I could just walk away from all these issues come quitting time. Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown, as they say. A: "Have you ever noticed how new presidents' hair starts going gray after just the first year?" B: "Oh, for sure—uneasy lies the head that wears the crown."
See also: crown, head, lie, that, uneasy, wear
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.

Prov. A person who has a lot of power and prestige also has a lot of responsibilities, and therefore worries more than other people. (From Shakespeare's play, Henry IV, Part II.) Susan began to have trouble sleeping shortly after she was promoted to head of her department. "Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown," her friends teased.
See also: crown, head, lie, that, uneasy, wear
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As Mrs May has learned: uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.
Those who choose to ignore the will of the people and attempt to crown themselves should recall the phrase: 'Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown'.
There never were truer words than Shakespeare's: "Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown."
UNEASY lies the head that wears a crown and reigning Heineken Cup champions Wasps may lose all bragging rights this afternoon when they face former Cup kings Leicester at Welford Road.
His instinct for the dramatic, coupled with the power of his language literally pummels us into thinking--and feeling: "What would I have done if I were there?" That's why his plays are timeless, just as applicable today as they were in Elizabethan times--as is evidenced by two of the recurring themes in his plays: "Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown," and "The trusted lieutenant."
History doesn't record whether Shakespeare was a regular at Stratford races, but nobody could state it clearer than the Bard - uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.