Tuesday


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

a week from next Tuesday

An unspecified date or time far in the future, sometimes used to denote a time that will never come to pass. At this rate, it will be a week from next Tuesday before I'm ready to start writing this report. You can keep crying until a week from next Tuesday and I still won't buy you that new video game.
See also: next, Tuesday, week

Black Friday

1. Any day of major financial chaos or disaster; refers specifically to September 24, 1869, when stock speculators attempting to corner US gold trade caused the entire market to crash. The extremely fast growth in Wall Street has some economists worried that another Black Friday might be ahead if such growth continues unchecked.
2. The day after Thanksgiving in the US, on which extravagant sales create a frenzy of consumer activity in stores across the country. I hate working in retail on Black Friday—everyone acts like a crazy person!
See also: black, Friday

cheap-arse Tuesday

The day of the week in Australia when many goods and services are offered at lower prices or as part of discounted deals. Primarily heard in Australia. When I was studying in university, cheap-arse Tuesday was my favorite day of the week!
See also: Tuesday

see you next Tuesday

vulgar slang A euphemism for "cunt," based on the sound of the first two words ("C U") and the initials of the next two.
See also: next, see, Tuesday

a week tomorrow/on (some day)/etc.

One week from the day specified. Primarily heard in UK. I'm flying to Ireland a week on Saturday for my brother's wedding. We need that report finished a week tomorrow.
See also: on, tomorrow, week

a week yesterday/last (some day)/etc.

One week before the day specified. They only gave me the assignment a week yesterday, so I'm really stressed out about getting it finished by tomorrow. Chris left on his work trip a week last Tuesday.
See also: last, week, yesterday

Giving Tuesday

In the US, the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, on which people are encouraged to make charitable donations. The day stands in contrast to Black Friday and Cyber Monday, which are typically heavy shopping days after the Thanksgiving holiday. I always donate money to my high school alma mater on Giving Tuesday.
See also: Give, Tuesday

Tuesday's child is full of grace

People born on a Tuesday will supposedly be very gracious, agreeable, refined, and polite in manner or behavior. From a nursery rhyme called "Monday's Child" meant to help children remember the days of the week (and predict a child's future). The modern version of the poem commonly reads: Monday's child is fair of face, Tuesday's child is full of grace, Wednesday's child is full of woe, Thursday's child has far to go, Friday's child is loving and giving, Saturday's child works hard for a living, And the child that is born on the Sabbath day, Is bonny and blithe, and good and gay. His mother likes to tell people that he was born on a Tuesday, because she likes to boast about how well-mannered he is and "Tuesday's child is full of grace."
See also: child, full, grace, of

from here till next Tuesday

1. All over the place; over a very wide area or distance. I shudder to think of shopping on Black Friday, when every store from here till next Tuesday is crawling with consumers. When I saw my brother get off the train, I had a smile on my face from here till next Tuesday.
2. For a long time. Good luck escaping Aunt Louise, she could talk from here till next Tuesday.
See also: here, next, till, Tuesday

from here till next Tuesday

Rur. for a great distance; for a long time. If you try that again, I'll knock you from here till next Tuesday. You can lecture him from here till next Tuesday, but he won't listen.
See also: here, next, till, Tuesday

Black Friday

1. Also Black Monday, Black Tuesday, etc. A day of economic catastrophe, as in We feared there'd be another Black Friday. This usage dates from September 24, 1869, a Friday when stock manipulators Jay Gould and James Fisk tried to corner the gold market and caused its collapse. The adjective black has been appended to similar occasions ever since, including October 29, 1929, the Tuesday of the market collapse that marked the start of the Great Depression, and Black Monday of October 19, 1987, when the stock market experienced its greatest fall since the Great Depression.
2. Any day marked by great confusion or activity, as in It was just my luck to be traveling on Black Tuesday. This usage, too, is based on the events of 1869, marked by economic chaos. It has since been extended to other kinds of confusion, such as an accident hampering traffic during the evening rush hour.
See also: black, Friday