tomorrow is another day

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tomorrow is another day

Tomorrow will bring a chance for a better result, despire recent misfortunes, unpleasantness, or lack of success I know you're upset about losing the game, sweetie, but tomorrow is another day. I'm so frustrated with how things went. Oh well, no sense dwelling on it—tomorrow's another day.
See also: another, tomorrow

Tomorrow is another day.

Prov. Things may improve tomorrow; tomorrow you will have a chance to solve the problems that are upsetting you today. (Often used to encourage someone to relax and wait until tomorrow to do or worry about something.) Child: This math homework is horrible! I can't do it! Mother: Put it away for tonight and go to bed. You'll be able to think more clearly when you've had some sleep, and tomorrow is another day.
See also: another, tomorrow

tomorrow is another day

One may not accomplish everything today but will have another chance. For example, We've stuffed hundreds of envelopes and still aren't done, but tomorrow is another day . This comforting maxim was first put as Tomorrow is a new day about 1520, was widely repeated, and changed to its present form in the mid-1800s.
See also: another, tomorrow

tomorrow is another day

When something bad has happened, you say tomorrow is another day to mean that things may be better in the future. I didn't play well, but tomorrow is another day. Note: This expression comes from the novel `Gone with the Wind' by Margaret Mitchell, where, after a series of disasters, the character Scarlett O'Hara says it.
See also: another, tomorrow

tomorrow is another day

the future will bring fresh opportunities.
This phrase was in use as long ago as the early 16th century, in the form tomorrow is a new day .
See also: another, tomorrow

tomorrow is another day

You’ve done enough for one day so leave the rest until tomorrow; also, you may have lost today but you may win the next time. The first meaning, similar to Rome was not built in a day, dates at least from the sixteenth century, when it was sometimes put as tomorrow is a new day (by Lyly and others; quoted by Jonathan Swift in 1738). The exact current wording dates from the early nineteenth century, and the second meaning of that same expression from the early twentieth century. “Tomorrow’s another day,” wrote Paul Green (The Field God, 1927), and less ambiguously, Barbara Pym in A Few Green Leaves (1980), “He would probably have . . . missed his opportunity. Still, tomorrow was another day.” In the motion picture Gone With the Wind (1939), Scarlett O’Hara’s concluding line, after losing Tara and Rhett Butler, is, “After all, tomorrow is another day.”
See also: another, tomorrow
References in periodicals archive ?
Tomorrow's another day indeed: Real host Tottenham in the first leg of their Champions League quarter-final with the pressure surely cranked up given the current state of their La Liga campaign.
The tracks are "Quieres Bailar?", "We're Gonna Take a Trip (Vamos a Viajar)", "Brinca, Jump!", "Mama, No Me Quiero Dormir (Mama, I Don't Want to Sleep)", "Todas Las Comidas (All the Foods)", "Tomorrow's Another Day (Manana es Otro Dia)", "Don't Ever Give Up", "Hay Que Trabajar (We All Have to Work)", "Cantame Una Cancion (Sing Me a Sng)", "De Colores (All the Colors)", "Te Amo (I Love You)", and "Would You Like to Dance?".
Which novel had the working title Tomorrow's Another Day?
'But tomorrow's another day and we haven't given up.'
He said: 'Tomorrow's another day and we're looking forward to that.
His later novels, often similarly tough-minded, include Iron Man (1930), The Silver Eagle (1931), The Giant Swing (1932), Dark Hazard (1933), Goodbye to the Past (1934), King Cole (1936), High Sierra (1940); Nobody Lives Forever (1943), Tomorrow's Another Day (1945), The Asphalt Jungle (1956), Captain Lightfoot (1954), Pale Moon (1956), and Underdog (1957).