lie low, to

(redirected from To lie low)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to To lie low: lie in wait, lay around, lying low

lie low

1. To be, make oneself, or remain hidden or inconspicuous; to avoid being found, detected, or scrutinized by others. (Also worded as "lay low.") I'm sorry I haven't been around to see you lately, but with the police investigating the company I thought it would be better to lie low for a while.
2. By extension, to keep to oneself; to avoid interactions with others. I think I'm just going to lie low at home this weekend, I don't really feel like going out at all.
See also: lie, low
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

lie low

 and lay low
Fig. to keep quiet and not be noticed; to avoid being conspicuous. (Lay is a common error for lie.) I suggest you lie low for a few days. The robber said that he would lay low for a short time after the robbery.
See also: lie, low
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lie low

Also lay low. Keep oneself or one's plans hidden; bide one's time to act. For example, The children lay low, hoping their prank would soon be forgotten, or The senator decided to lay low until his opponent had committed herself to raising taxes . This expression calls up the image of a hunter concealed in the brush, waiting for game. [Colloquial; late 1800s]
See also: lie, low
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lie low

COMMON If you lie low, you hide or you take care not to make people notice you. Far from lying low, Kuti became more outspoken than ever. Their plan had been to move by night only, to lie low, to avoid contact.
See also: lie, low
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

lie low

(especially of a criminal) keep out of sight; avoid detection or attention.
See also: lie, low
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

lie ˈlow

(informal) hide or keep quiet for a short time: The thieves lay low for a few days in a farmhouse, then tried to leave the country with the money.
See also: lie, low
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

lie low, to

To conceal oneself or one’s intentions. An American colloquialism of the nineteenth century, the term calls up the image of a hunter quietly concealed in the brush, waiting for game. An early appearance is in one of Joel Chandler Harris’s Uncle Remus stories: “All this while Brer Rabbit lay low.”
See also: lie
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
In the third of six offerings, Desrae takes Cathy under her wing following a close shave with an attacker, and advises her to lie low in Soho, where the teenager meets the policeman who helped her escape her mother.
But when his cousin Raj Thackeray quit the party and repeated the same allegations, Narvekar was forced to lie low for a long while.
In this installment of the SF trilogy, the six young people are flying down the East Coast, searching for their parents, when one of them is badly hurt in a clash with Erasers and they're forced to lie low while he recovers.
Consider this observation about people: "If your strategy is to lie low, do your job, follow instructions, and hope that nobody notices you, [a] nobody will ever notice you, and [b] you're actually increasing the chances of something bad happening." Want to know what happens to people in today's economy who aren't remarkable?
Nearly 12 years ago, Navratilova told The Advocate that she was asked to lie low so she wouldn't put off any potential sportsors.
"I've heard from people in his class that he's going to try to lie low and just try and get a lot of work in for his finals.
Set in the bitter cold landscape surrounding Lake Winnipeg, Kanadiana is a film noir, Fargo-esque thriller that tells the story of two brothers who head north to lie low after a diamond heist, and wind up following a runaway waitress who unknowingly ends up with the diamonds stashed in the back of her truck.
Some rattlers prefer to lie low rather than rattle and attack, and thus pose less of a threat than most people realize, conclude two wildfire biologists who conducted field experiments in which they walked by and hopped over the snakes.
WHEN Donald "Chip" Pugh saw a Facebook post from the Lima Police Department, in Ohio, asking for the public's help in locating Pugh, who had missed a court appearance for a drinkdriving charge, he didn't think to lie low. Instead, he decided that the mug shots the cops used weren't nearly flattering enough and sent them a selfie - taken in a car - with a message saying: "Here is a better photo, that one is horrible".
It would probably be wise to lie low from the real LiLo, 27, for a while, too, Franco.
and although Lopez tried to lie low they couldn't help but attract attention.
Perhaps it is a clever ploy to lie low and allow the separatist policies of some of our political parties to break up the union and take the blame for its consequences.
Has his friend the future Archbishop of Canterbury has asked him to lie low or is he a coward?
Yet his tactics appear to be to lie low and say nothing.
He is one of two hitmen ordered to lie low in the medieval city after an assignment goes wrong.