go overboard, to

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go overboard

1. Literally, to fall off of a boat. Be careful standing so close to the edge—we don't want anyone to go overboard!
2. To act without restraint in some area. Did I go overboard with the Christmas decorations? I'm worried I bought enough Christmas lights to light up Times Square.
See also: go, overboard

go overboard

 
1. Fig. to fall out of a boat or off of a ship; to fall overboard. Be careful or you will go overboard. Someone went overboard in the fog.
2. Fig. to do too much; to be extravagant. Look, Sally, let's have a nice party, but don't go overboard. It doesn't need to be fancy. Okay, you can buy a big comfortable car, but don't go overboard on price.
See also: go, overboard

go overboard

Show excessive enthusiasm, act in an excessive way. For example, It's easy to go overboard with a new stock offering, or She really went overboard, hiring the most expensive caterer. [Mid-1900s]
See also: go, overboard

go overboard

1 be highly enthusiastic. 2 behave immoderately; go too far.
The idea behind this idiom is that of recklessly jumping over the side of a ship into the water.
See also: go, overboard

go ˈoverboard (about/for somebody/something)

(informal) be too excited or enthusiastic about something or about doing something: I told her just to cook a simple meal but she went completely overboard.He doesn’t just like her. He’s gone completely overboard about her.
See also: go, overboard

go overboard

in. to do far more than is necessary. Now don’t go overboard for us. We’re just folks.
See also: go, overboard

go overboard

To go to extremes, especially as a result of enthusiasm.
See also: go, overboard

go overboard, to

To go to extremes; to overreact, especially in favor of something or someone. This expression, which conjures up the extreme act of jumping or falling off a ship, dates from the first half of the twentieth century. For a time it signified living beyond one’s means, but that meaning is no longer current. John P. Marquand used the term in its contemporary sense (Melville Goodwin, 1951): “Did you ever hear about General Goodwin going overboard over an American girl in Paris?”
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References in periodicals archive ?
As a nation, we tend to go overboard in defeat and in victory, but the calm and level-headed attitude of the Welsh coach Mike Ruddock has been exemplary, and has kept our feet (almost) on the ground.
Writers are invited to go overboard with their entry for this year's Gateshead short story competition.
Document after document has warned the faithful not to go overboard in devotion to Mary.
A part from suspecting that he occasionally invents a myth to attack, it might also be objected that Humphreys has a tendency to go overboard in his desire to be nonjudgmental and even-handed by glossing over controversies, refraining from taking definite stands, and wryly dismissing possibly legitimate criticisms because they apply to others (especially Americans) as well.
As the ad fades out, the viewer is told not to go overboard when investing on-line.
But boss Ron Bradbury does not want to go overboard, trying to keep the feet of talented youngsters such as Steve Farmer, who made his league debut just a few days after his 18th birthday, Richard Barratt, Leon Kelly and Paul White very much on the ground.
Although it's tempting to go overboard with accessories, all you really need are a canoe, a sleeping bag, and food.
However, if we believed participants were going to take the program on board, perhaps we could have spent more time during the program helping them learn not to go overboard with their new behavioral skills.
That willingness to lend the FBI's imprimatur to unverified allegations probably didn't prompt any agent to go overboard. But when the FBI winks at even a little entrepreneurial spying, there may be cause for worry.
The handicapper won't be able to go overboard after this and it would be no surprise if Terramarique were able to stay ahead of the assessor while the ground remains on top.
ALL of the banks and building societies will be having a field day now,aspeople who have already overspent in the run-up toChristmas continue to go overboard now the sales have arrived.