bury the hatchet, to

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bury the hatchet

1. To make peace with someone. Can you please bury the hatchet and make up with your sister already? I can't take the constant fighting.
2. slang To accidentally leave medical instruments inside a patient after surgery. The surgeons have a strict protocol to avoid burying the hatchet, so to speak.
See also: bury, hatchet
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bury the hatchet

Fig. to make peace. Let's stop arguing and bury the hatchet. Tom and I buried the hatchet and we are good friends now.
See also: bury, hatchet
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bury the hatchet

Make peace; settle one's differences. For example, Toward the end of the year, the roommates finally decided to bury the hatchet. Although some believe this term comes from a Native American custom for declaring peace between warring tribes, others say it comes from hang up one's hatchet, a term dating from the early 1300s (well before Columbus landed in the New World). The word bury replaced hang up in the 1700s.
See also: bury, hatchet
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bury the hatchet

When people who have argued bury the hatchet, they agree to forget their argument and become friends again. Note: A hatchet is a small axe. They had finally buried the hatchet after their falling-out. Note: In the past, when Native American tribes made peace after fighting each other, it was traditional for each tribe to bury a tomahawk or small axe, as a sign of peace.
See also: bury, hatchet
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

bury the hatchet

end a quarrel or conflict and become friendly.
This expression makes reference to a Native American custom of burying a hatchet or tomahawk to mark the conclusion of a peace treaty.
See also: bury, hatchet
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ˌbury the ˈhatchet

,

ˌbury your ˈdifferences

(of two people or groups) agree to forget past disagreements and be friends again: I’ve said I’m prepared to bury the hatchet, but John says he won’t forgive me for what happened.When Native Americans agreed to end fighting and begin a period of peace they held a ceremony in which they buried a hatchet or tomahawk (= a small axe).
See also: bury, hatchet
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

bury the hatchet

1. tv. to make peace. (From an alleged American Indian practice.) I’m sorry. Let’s stop arguing and bury the hatchet.
2. tv. to leave surgical instruments in the patient. (Medical.) The idea that a doctor would bury the hatchet is a very old joke.
See also: bury, hatchet
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

bury the hatchet

To stop fighting; resolve a quarrel.
See also: bury, hatchet
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bury the hatchet, to

To make peace or call a truce. Some North American Indian tribes declared peace by burying a tomahawk, a custom described by Samuel Sewell in 1680 and referred to again in subsequent accounts of the American colonies. The term appears in Longfellow’s famous poem, “Hiawatha,” and by the end of the nineteenth century was a cliché for peacemaking on both sides of the Atlantic.
See also: bury
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

bury the hatchet

To make peace, to settle differences. The phrase comes from the practice among native American and Canadian tribes literally to bury a war axe at the end of hostilities. An 1680 report describes European colonists in what became New England: “Meeting wth ye Sachem [the tribal leaders] the[y] came to an agreemt and buried two Axes in ye Ground; which ceremony to them is more significant & binding than all Articles of Peace . . .”
See also: bury, hatchet
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in periodicals archive ?
Manager Roberto Mancini's decision to bury the hatchet with Balotelli following their training ground bust-up on Thursday may pay further dividends after Sergio Aguero confirmed he has a torn hamstring muscle that could keep him out for several weeks.
He lauded the sacrifices of Nawab Akber Khan Bugti, Nawabzada Balaach Mari and other Balochs and demanded of all Balochs to bury the hatchet and struggle for accomplishing the mission of these leaders.
HAMILTON No.2 Stuart Taylor insists it is time for Accies and Morton to bury the hatchet.
It sounds like a fascinating read, published by Y Lolfa, but I think he might be on the wrong tack when he says that despite our old enmity we are ready to bury the hatchet.
Whatever the politics involved, the Baggies chairman should have found a way to bury the hatchet with Gary Megson.
FORMER Ibrox idol Ian Durrant has pleaded with Rangers and Aberdeen fans to bury the hatchet over their bitter feud.
REGULARS at television's most famous pub the Rovers' Return could soon be enjoying a pint with their Kenilworth counterparts in a bid to bury the hatchet.
Newcastle captain Dean Ryan is prepared to bury the hatchet as he and Rob Andrew play at Wasps for the first time since their dramatic exit from the London club.
Both sides of the controversy reluctantly agreed to bury the hatchet (at least on this issue) and to cooperate in examining recovery room processes to find the common or systemic cause.
Linda then takes it upon herself to get them to bury the hatchet. Chance would be a fine thing...
Scott plucks up the courage to tell Annalise how he really feels, Barney realises it's time to bury the hatchet with his parents, and the fraught relations between Mercedes and Jacqui reach an all-time low.
Moores has now agreed to bury the hatchet with Morgan -a Liverpool fanatic estimated to be worth more than pounds 350m and the club's third largest shareholder -and to meet to discuss his grievances at not being allowed more influence and cash input at Anfield.
The former green army manager tried to bury the hatchet with the Manchester United skipper in an astonishing interview on The Late Late Sho (RTE).
Cash-strapped Fergie has made a desperate bid to bury the hatchet with the Queen.