bite the dust, to

(redirected from To bite the dust)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to To bite the dust: cold comfort, bitten the dust

bite the dust

1. slang Of a person, to die. We were so lucky to avoid that massive accident—we might have bitten the dust!
2. slang Of a machine, to be near a complete breakdown or loss of functionality. Judging by all that noise coming from her car, I'm pretty sure it's about to bite the dust. I have to go buy a new blender because mine bit the dust today.
3. slang To become unpopular or irrelevant. Sadly, it doesn't take long for the latest technological innovations to bite the dust.
See also: bite, dust
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bite the dust

 
1. Sl. to die. A shot rang out, and another cowboy bit the dust. The soldier was too young to bite the dust.
2. Sl. to break; to fail; to give out. My old car finally bit the dust. This pen is out of ink and has bitten the dust.
See also: bite, dust
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bite the dust

Suffer defeat or death, as in The 1990 election saw both of our senators bite the dust. Although this expression was popularized by American Western films of the 1930s, in which either cowboys or Indians were thrown from their horses to the dusty ground, it originated much earlier. Tobias Smollett had it in Gil Blas (1750): "We made two of them bite the dust."
See also: bite, dust
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bite the dust

COMMON
1. If something bites the dust, it fails or stops existing. With the news that milk chocolate can help cut cholesterol, yet another healthy eating fad bites the dust. Quite a few restaurants have bitten the dust recently.
2. If someone bites the dust, they die. A Wild West showman nearly bit the dust when he blew himself up making blank bullets in his garden shed. Note: This expression is used to refer to someone's death in a humorous way. Note: In stories about the Wild West, cowboys were said to `bite the dust' when they were shot and fell off their horses.
See also: bite, dust
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

bite the dust

1 be killed. 2 fail. informal
See also: bite, dust
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

bite the ˈdust

(informal)
1 fail, or be defeated or destroyed: Thousands of small businesses bite the dust every year.
2 (humorous) die
See also: bite, dust
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

bite the dust

1. tv. to die. A shot rang out, and another cowboy bit the dust.
2. tv. to break; to fail; to give out. My car finally bit the dust.
See also: bite, dust
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

bite the dust

Slang
1. To fall dead, especially in combat.
2. To be defeated.
3. To come to an end.
See also: bite, dust
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bite the dust, to

To be defeated or killed. The term became popular from American western films, in which cowboys and/or Indians frequently “bit the dust”—that is, were shot or shoved off their horses to the dusty ground. It became current in the late 1930s. However, the term occurs even earlier in William Cullen Bryant’s translation (1870) of Homer’s Iliad (“his fellow warriors . . . fall round him to the earth and bite the dust”) and it also is found in translations of Virgil’s Aeneid.
See also: bite
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
OH dear, looks like another boy band are about to bite the dust.
COWBOY roofers are to bite the dust in Coventry following the launch of a government quality assurance scheme.
3 Colin Montgomerie, the reigning Cisco World Matchplay champion at Wentworth, was the biggest name to bite the dust, the Scot going down to fellow European raider Thomas Bjorn at the 23rd hole after a ding-dong battle.
More than 5,000 seagulls are set to bite the dust this weekend when they swoop on killer sandwiches.
I would urge you good people not to allow such a distinguished club which has existed since the 1870s to bite the dust.
Their departure makes This Morning the third show to bite the dust following Match Of The Day and The Royle Family.
Agassi took the first set 6-2 before losing the next three 7-6, 6-4, 7-6 to become the biggest name to bite the dust in a dramatic opening day.